WIT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - wit in Mansfield Park
1  To the theatre he went, and reached it just in time to witness the first meeting of his father and his friend.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
2  You need not hurry when the object is only to prevent my saying a bon mot, for there is not the least wit in my nature.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
3  Such a look of reproach at Edmund from his father she could never have expected to witness; and to feel that it was in any degree deserved was an aggravation indeed.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
4  You are the only being upon earth to whom I should say what I have said; but you have always known my opinion of her; you can bear me witness, Fanny, that I have never been blinded.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
5  It was all known at the Parsonage, where he loved to talk over the future with both his sisters, and it would be rather gratifying to him to have enlightened witnesses of the progress of his success.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
6  She was not to be won by all that gallantry and wit and good-nature together could do; or, at least, she would not be won by them nearly so soon, without the assistance of sentiment and feeling, and seriousness on serious subjects.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
7  She either sat in gloomy silence, wrapt in such gravity as nothing could subdue, no curiosity touch, no wit amuse; or allowing the attentions of Mr. Yates, was talking with forced gaiety to him alone, and ridiculing the acting of the others.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
8  The harp arrived, and rather added to her beauty, wit, and good-humour; for she played with the greatest obligingness, with an expression and taste which were peculiarly becoming, and there was something clever to be said at the close of every air.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
9  Fanny naturally turned upstairs, and took her guest to the apartment which was now always fit for comfortable use; opening the door, however, with a most aching heart, and feeling that she had a more distressing scene before her than ever that spot had yet witnessed.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
10  I ought to have sent you an account of your cousin's first party, but I was lazy, and now it is too long ago; suffice it, that everything was just as it ought to be, in a style that any of her connexions must have been gratified to witness, and that her own dress and manners did her the greatest credit.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIII
11  It came happily while she was thus waiting; and there being neither ceremony nor fearfulness to delay the moment of meeting, she was with him as he entered the house, and the first minutes of exquisite feeling had no interruption and no witnesses, unless the servants chiefly intent upon opening the proper doors could be called such.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
12  She was too indolent even to accept a mother's gratification in witnessing their success and enjoyment at the expense of any personal trouble, and the charge was made over to her sister, who desired nothing better than a post of such honourable representation, and very thoroughly relished the means it afforded her of mixing in society without having horses to hire.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  Everything was now in a regular train: theatre, actors, actresses, and dresses, were all getting forward; but though no other great impediments arose, Fanny found, before many days were past, that it was not all uninterrupted enjoyment to the party themselves, and that she had not to witness the continuance of such unanimity and delight as had been almost too much for her at first.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII