YOUNG in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - young in Pride and Prejudice
1  Perhaps he thought her too young.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
2  She is a most charming young lady indeed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
3  He was a tall, heavy-looking young man of five-and-twenty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
4  But I can assure the young ladies that I come prepared to admire them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
5  Elizabeth accepted their company, and the three young ladies set off together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  He is also handsome," replied Elizabeth, "which a young man ought likewise to be, if he possibly can.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
7  This was exactly as it should be; for the young man wanted only regimentals to make him completely charming.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
8  The eldest of them, a sensible, intelligent young woman, about twenty-seven, was Elizabeth's intimate friend.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  If I were as rich as Mr. Darcy," cried a young Lucas, who came with his sisters, "I should not care how proud I was.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
10  One cannot wonder that so very fine a young man, with family, fortune, everything in his favour, should think highly of himself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
11  I have often observed how little young ladies are interested by books of a serious stamp, though written solely for their benefit.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
12  He had entertained hopes of being admitted to a sight of the young ladies, of whose beauty he had heard much; but he saw only the father.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
13  He was quite young, wonderfully handsome, extremely agreeable, and, to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly with a large party.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
14  But the attention of every lady was soon caught by a young man, whom they had never seen before, of most gentlemanlike appearance, walking with another officer on the other side of the way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
15  Lady Catherine herself says that, in point of true beauty, Miss de Bourgh is far superior to the handsomest of her sex, because there is that in her features which marks the young lady of distinguished birth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
16  Elizabeth Bennet," said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, "is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
17  The village of Longbourn was only one mile from Meryton; a most convenient distance for the young ladies, who were usually tempted thither three or four times a week, to pay their duty to their aunt and to a milliner's shop just over the way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
18  Mr. Denny and Mr. Wickham walked with the young ladies to the door of Mr. Phillip's house, and then made their bows, in spite of Miss Lydia's pressing entreaties that they should come in, and even in spite of Mrs. Phillips's throwing up the parlour window and loudly seconding the invitation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
19  She received him with her very best politeness, which he returned with as much more, apologising for his intrusion, without any previous acquaintance with her, which he could not help flattering himself, however, might be justified by his relationship to the young ladies who introduced him to her notice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
20  Mrs. Bennet and her daughters apologised most civilly for Lydia's interruption, and promised that it should not occur again, if he would resume his book; but Mr. Collins, after assuring them that he bore his young cousin no ill-will, and should never resent her behaviour as any affront, seated himself at another table with Mr. Bennet, and prepared for backgammon.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14