12th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 12: With Definition - 3
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 Grade 12: With Definition - 3
denizenspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. inhabitant or resident; regular visitor
Sometimes this throat uttered Yes, sometimes it uttered No; sometimes it made inquiries about a time worn denizen of the place.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: 3 How a Little Sound Produced a Great Dream
The small denizens of the wilderness hardly took pains to move out of her path.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne
Get Context   In XVIII. A FLOOD OF SUNSHINE
He was well known to the sallow denizens of the lane; for such of them as were on the look-out to buy or sell, nodded, familiarly, as he passed along.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
deplorablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. of very poor quality or condition; bringing or deserving severe rebuke or censure
There will be a deplorable scene, whenever we are married.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. DORA'S AUNTS
Now, I am aware that there was a most deplorable occurrence in our house last night.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In XIII. THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND STAIN
He was a tearful boy, and broke into such deplorable lamentations, when a cessation of our connexion was hinted at, that we were obliged to keep him.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
depositionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. testimony under oath; act of depositing, especially laying down of matter by natural process
Yes, yes, the mortuary deposition.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 28. The Prison Register.
The dying man had signed a deposition declaring Benedetto to be the assassin.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 84. Beauchamp.
The servant instantly showed it to one of the others, who, without saying a word to any of the family, went to a magistrate; and, upon their deposition, Justine was apprehended.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
depreciatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. lessen price or value of; think or speak of as being of little worth; belittle
I depreciated Paris; I depreciated France.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
But what further depreciates the whale as a civilized dish, is his exceeding richness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 65. The Whale as a Dish.
He carried his head on one side, partly in modest depreciation of himself, partly in modest propitiation of everybody else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
derivativespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. unoriginal; derived from another source
I derived that, from the look they interchanged.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
We always derived profound satisfaction from making an appointment for this purpose.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
He was as mute and senseless as the box, from which his form derived the only expression it had.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30. A LOSS
designatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. indicate or specify; point out; assign a name or title to
You know with what idle designs I began; but this is the end of them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
But now, after such dishonorable usage, who can tell what were his designs on her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
I wanted to be for the tenth time, but the post was taken, said Count Siniavin to the pretty Princess Tcharskaya, who had designs on him.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 5: Chapter 5
deterioratespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. become progressively worse; decline
And from what I heard, Joseph contributed much to his deterioration, by a narrow-minded partiality which prompted him to flatter and pet him, as a boy, because he was the head of the old family.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
devastatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. ruin; lay waste; destroy; make desolate
There was something devastatingly true in what he said.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 13
They had nursed the wounded, closed dying eyes, suffered war and fire and devastation, known terror and flight and starvation.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
dialectspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. vocabulary that is for a specific group of people
I did; but they were uttered in the Romaic dialect.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 34. The Colosseum.
dialect, they usually gave different names to the same.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
No outlaw in this land uses the dialect in which thou hast spoken.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
diaphragmspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a thin disk that vibrates when receiving or producing sound waves, as in a telephone, microphone, speaker, or the like
dictumspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a formal pronouncement from an authoritative source
dignitaryspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. an important or influential person, and often overbearing
Among the latter was the Prior of Jorvaulx, in the most gallant trim which a dignitary of the church could venture to exhibit.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
This was the time for Wemmick to produce a little kettle, a tray of glasses, and a black bottle with a porcelain-topped cork, representing some clerical dignitary of a rubicund and social aspect.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
At the end were the signatures of the high dignitaries who had signed it.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In XI. The Adventure of The Naval Treaty
dilatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. make wider or larger; cause to expand; enlarge; widen
The count felt his heart dilate and throb; he opened his arms, and Haidee, uttering a cry, sprang into them.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 117. The Fifth of October.
On the other hand, the stately form of the Norman appeared to dilate in magnitude, like that of the eagle, which ruffles up its plumage when about to pounce on its defenceless prey.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
The pupils of his eyes, as he gazed at Monte Cristo dilated horribly.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 46. Unlimited Credit.
discretionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. knowing how to avoid embarrassment or distress; trait of judging wisely and objectively
If I were you, whatever I did should be done at my own discretion entirely.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
Use your own discretion, however, in communicating to her what I have told you.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
In our boyish want of discretion I dare say we took too much to drink, and I know we talked too much.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
disgruntlespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. cause being in bad temper; disappoint; disconcert
Besides, the dashing blockade runners were bringing in these very things under the Yankees' disgruntled noses, and that made the possession of them many times more thrilling.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
disillusionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a freeing or a being freed from illusion or conviction
Night witchery and morning disillusion were alike forgotten in the march of realities and days.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
He turned his slow, rather full eyes, that had been drowned in such fathomless disillusion, on Connie, and she trembled a little.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 3
Levin had not the heart to disillusion him of the notion that there could be something delightful apart from her, and so said nothing.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 5: Chapter 2
disintegratespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. fall apart; become reduced to components, fragments, or particles
If lack of sex is going to disintegrate you, then go out and have a love-affair.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 5
If lack of a child is going to disintegrate you, then have a child if you possibly can.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 5
She had had a premonition of it in the blind motions of her mating-instinct; but they had been checked by the disintegrating influences of the life about her.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 13
dispelspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. scatter; drive away; cause to vanish
I thought, if I had caused the cloud, it was my duty to make an effort to dispel it.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
Employment, even melancholy, may dispel melancholy, and her occupations were hopeful.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVI
Now that the deed was done, she realized this with a wave of homesickness hard to dispel.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
dispensaryspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. clinic where medicine and medical supplies are dispensed
In the first place, the dispensary is needed.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 3: Chapter 3
His residence and principal consulting-room is at Kennington Road, but he has a branch surgery and dispensary at Lower Brixton Road, two miles away.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In VIII. THE ADVENTURE OF THE SIX NAPOLEONS
Doctors and dispensaries are no use to me.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 3: Chapter 3
dispensespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. distribute; prepare and give out; deal out in parts or portions
Let us dispense with useless words.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 107. The Lions' Den.
I was so much better that I thought I could dispense with one.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In XI. The Adventure of The Naval Treaty
This treasure, as in duty bound, I laid at the feet of Steerforth, and begged him to dispense.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
displacementspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. act of removing from office or employment
The reason of her sudden displacement now appeared.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: 2 Humanity Appears upon the Scene, Hand in Hand with Trouble
As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In VI. THE ADVENTURE OF BLACK PETER
I appeared to feel the warm breath of it displacing the sleet-laden wind.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
disquietspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. make uneasy or anxious; trouble
I am far from happy, Miss Havisham; but I have other causes of disquiet than any you know of.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
Yet Estella was so inseparable from all my restlessness and disquiet of mind, that I really fell into confusion as to the limits of my own part in its production.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
In vain should I attempt to describe the astonishment and disquiet of Herbert, when he and I and Provis sat down before the fire, and I recounted the whole of the secret.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
disreputablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. lacking respectability in character or behavior or appearance
However, I must not sit gossiping here, but must get these disreputable clothes off and return to my highly respectable self.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In XI. THE ADVENTURE OF THE BERYL CORONET
When the first hour was out, Stephen even began to have an uncomfortable sensation upon him of being for the time a disreputable character.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
Beside the couch was a wooden chair, and on the angle of the back hung a very seedy and disreputable hard-felt hat, much the worse for wear, and cracked in several places.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In VII. THE ADVENTURE OF THE BLUE CARBUNCLE
dissectspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. cut open or cut apart; make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis of; break down into components or essential features
He might dissect, anatomize, and give names; but, not to speak of a final cause, causes in their secondary and tertiary grades were utterly unknown to him.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
I confess, that since Jonah, few whalemen have penetrated very far beneath the skin of the adult whale; nevertheless, I have been blessed with an opportunity to dissect him in miniature.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 102. A Bower in the Arsacides.
He had no time for dissections, but he knew that he thought of the bullets only as things that could prevent him from reaching the place of his endeavor.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 23
disusespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. the state of something that has been unused and neglected
The house seemed as dreary as a disused street.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 2
Moreover, fifty yards off stood a hut, built of clods and covered with thin turves, but now entirely disused.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 4: 7 The Tragic Meeting of Two Old Friends
Not a blind was raised; no sign of life was in the dull paved court, with its covered way leading to the disused door.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 56. THE NEW WOUND, AND THE OLD
diversespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. differing in some characteristics; various
His meditations were of the most complex and diverse character.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 5: Chapter 26
All the most diverse sections of the educated public, hostile before, are merged in one.
Anna Karenina(V3) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 8: Chapter 16
The most diverse suppositions as to what he was about to speak of to her flashed into her brain.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 6: Chapter 21
docilespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. obedient; ready and willing to be taught; easily managed or handled
You always were my docile daughter.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT
It seemed to me that he despised him for being so simple and docile.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 1. The Shimerdas: VIII
At last he tapped his way upstairs, after bowing to everybody, docile and happy.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 2. The Hired Girls: VII
doggedspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. determined; stubbornly persevering; unyielding
He now dogged her footsteps, like Vaska.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 3: Chapter 18
The noise of firing dogged their footsteps.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 16
The guns, stolid and undaunted, spoke with dogged valor.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 6
dogmaticspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. stubbornly adhering to insufficiently proven beliefs; inflexible, rigid
He stated that his discourses to people were to be sometimes secular, and sometimes religious, but never dogmatic; and that his texts would be taken from all kinds of books.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 6: 4 Cheerfulness Again Asserts Itself at Blooms-End, and Clym Finds His
This sort of nose is usually a short and coarse one, but there is a sufficient number of exceptions to prevent me from being dogmatic or from insisting upon this point in my description.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In X. THE ADVENTURE OF THE GOLDEN PINCE-NEZ
His gentleness was never tinged by dogmatism, and his instructions were given with an air of frankness and good nature that banished every idea of pedantry.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
dominationspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. the exercise of control or influence over someone or something
An understanding of what such domination would mean, and of the disadvantages accruing from her rejection of it, was brought home to Lily with increasing clearness during the early weeks of the winter.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 8
Now he is in his glory, dominating the scene.
The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
Get Context   In Chapter 1
Money was the obsession dominating her mind these days.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
dormantspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. sleeping; not active but capable of becoming active
The house was dormant; one thread of smoke thickened against the trees.
Between the Acts (1941) By Virginia Woolf
Get Context   In Unit 12
This roused me from my nearly dormant state, and I ate some berries which I found hanging on the trees or lying on the ground.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
dotespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. be excessively fond of; show signs of mental decline
Melanie especially doted on him.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
No one except the doting father could see anything beautiful about her, but the neighbors were charitable enough to say that all ugly babies turned out pretty, eventually.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
It is out of the idolatrous dotings of the old Egyptians upon broiled ibis and roasted river horse, that you see the mummies of those creatures in their huge bake-houses the pyramids.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
dregsspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. sediment settled at bottom of liquid; waste or worthless matter
When he finally spoke his voice was as bitter as dregs.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 2
There was the same hearty cheering as before, and the mugs were emptied to the dregs.
Animal Farm By George Orwell
Get Context   In Chapter X
The bitter cup of adversity has been drained by me to the very dregs, and I feel that the grave is not far distant.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 112. The Departure.
drollspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. queer; amusingly odd; comical
There now; you see how droll he is.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
His expression was droll; it dismissed me lightly.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 5. Cuzak's Boys: II
His droll expression seemed to say that he had found the secret of contentment.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 2. The Hired Girls: XII
ductspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a bodily passage or tube lined with epithelial cells and conveying a secretion or other substance; an enclosed conduit for a fluid
dupespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. easily deceived person; duplicate of photographic image
A woman who could betray me for such a rival was not worth contending for; she deserved only scorn; less, however, than I, who had been her dupe.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
These despised themselves, as being the dupes of a wily fraud, a guileful snake in the grass.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
Cease, then, to allow yourself to be duped by vain hopes, that even your own excellent heart refuses to believe in.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 17. The Abbe's Chamber.
dynamicspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. energetic; vigorously active
All the great words, it seemed to Connie, were cancelled for her generation: love, joy, happiness, home, mother, father, husband, all these great, dynamic words were half dead now, and dying from day to day.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 6
eccentricspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. departing from a recognized, conventional, or established norm or pattern
I am afraid your principles on some points are eccentric.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
Doubtless you wish to make me appear a very eccentric character.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 88. The Insult.
Because, my dear fellow, you understand one must never be eccentric.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 78. We hear From Yanina.
eclecticspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. composed of elements from a variety of sources
His habitual touch was that of the eclectic, who lightly turns over and compares; and she was moved by this sudden glimpse into the laboratory where his faiths were formed.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 6
effusionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. flow under pressure; an unrestrained expression of emotion
She could not finish the generous effusion.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
Come, come; this is all an effusion of immediate want of spirits, Edward.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
Her daughters listened in silence to this effusion, sensible that any attempt to reason with her or soothe her would only increase the irritation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
egocentricspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. caring only about oneself; selfish; self-centered
He was reading one of the latest scientific-religious books: he had a streak of a spurious sort of religion in him, and was egocentrically concerned with the future of his own ego.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 16
elongatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. lengthen; extend; make or grow longer
How tempting, how very tempting, to let the view triumph; to reflect its ripple; to let their own minds ripple; to let outlines elongate and pitch over--so--with a sudden jerk.
Between the Acts (1941) By Virginia Woolf
Get Context   In Unit 5
So, then, an elongated Siamese ligature united us.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 72. The Monkey-Rope.
She persuaded him not to wear the small bow ties which made him look like an elongated Sunday School scholar.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
eloquentspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. vividly or movingly expressive; persuasive
Mr. Collins was eloquent in her praise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
Villefort had never been so concise and eloquent.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 110. The Indictment.
At this letter the eloquent eye of Noirtier gave her notice that she was to stop.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 59. The Will.
emancipatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. free from bondage, oppression, or restraint; liberate
It neither made him to be humane to his slaves, nor to emancipate them.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
I indulged a faint hope that his conversion would lead him to emancipate his slaves, and that, if he did not do this, it would, at any rate, make him more kind and humane.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
The more I see of emancipation the more criminal I think it is.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
embellishspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. adorn; make beautiful, as by ornamentation; decorate
You have shown your relish for it by the enthusiasm which has prompted you to chronicle, and, if you will excuse my saying so, somewhat to embellish so many of my own little adventures.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In II. THE RED-HEADED LEAGUE
She heard it all under embellishment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
Its smell and its colour are an embellishment of life, not a condition of it.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In XI. The Adventure of The Naval Treaty
embossspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. mold or carve in relief; decorate with or as if with a raised design
She tapped on the window with her embossed hairbrush.
Between the Acts (1941) By Virginia Woolf
Get Context   In Unit 1
She held out for him a massive gold watch, heavily embossed, from which dangled a chain with many fobs and seals.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI
So did they all--hand glasses, tin cans, scraps of scullery glass, harness room glass, and heavily embossed silver mirrors--all stopped.
Between the Acts (1941) By Virginia Woolf
Get Context   In Unit 11
embryospeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. completely undeveloped form; an animal organism in the early stages of growth
One of these virtuosi seemed to think that I might be an embryo, or abortive birth.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER III.
The Little Theaters, which were to give piquancy to American drama three or four years later, were only in embryo.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
eminentspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. standing out above other things; high in rank, office, or worth
He had the advice of an eminent oculist; and he eventually recovered the sight of that one eye.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
Thus it was with the men of rank, on whom their eminent position imposed the guardianship of the public morals.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne
Get Context   In XIII. ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER
The nurseries for males of noble or eminent birth, are provided with grave and learned professors, and their several deputies.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VI.
emitspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. give off; send out; give out as sound
Each time, Marija would emit a howl and fly at them, shaking her fists in their faces, stamping upon the floor, purple and incoherent with rage.
The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
Get Context   In Chapter 1
Zeena continued to look from one to the other; then she emitted her small strange laugh.
Ethan Frome By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In VII
Rain was still falling heavily, the whole expanse of heath before him emitting a subdued hiss under the downpour.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 5: 8 Rain, Darkness, and Anxious Wanderers
encampmentspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. temporary living quarters specially built by the army for soldiers; a site where people on holiday can pitch a tent
It had been resolved the night before to change their encampment.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 33. Roman Bandits.
The whole encampment, in a moment, became a scene of the most violent bustle and commotion.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
Just as she was preparing to start walking the long way across town to the Yankee encampment, a battered wagon appeared.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
enhancespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. make better or more attractive; increase; improve
Treat my assertion of its truth as a mere stroke of art to enhance its interest.
The Time Machine By H. G. Wells
Get Context   In XII
Rumors of Abolitionist sympathies did not enhance the popularity of the MacIntoshes.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
They stimulate him to greater watchfulness, and enhance his power to capture his slave.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
enigmaspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. puzzle; a person or thing that is mysterious or difficult to understand
The man was an enigma to Franz.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 36. The Carnival at Rome.
To Scarlett, he was still an enigma but an enigma about which she no longer bothered her head.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIX
Levin tried to understand him, and could not understand him, and looked at him and his life as at a living enigma.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 3: Chapter 26
ensemblespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. union of parts in a whole; a coordinated outfit or costume; a coordinated set of furniture
enthrallspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. capture; attract and hold by charm, beauty, or excellence; hold in bondage or subjection
Moreover, other ideas, much more enthralling, occupied his mind.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 32. The Waking.
Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled and speechless throughout the covered cloister.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XI
After an interval of suspense on my part that was quite enthralling and almost painful, I saw his hand appear on the other side of Miss Skiffins.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
entreatyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a serious and urgent request; an earnest or humble request
Most earnestly did she then entreaty him to lose no more time before he wrote.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
I could not have resisted its entreaty, if the assurance that it gave me had been less convincing.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. MR. DICK FULFILS MY AUNT'S PREDICTIONS
But Mr. Peggotty made no such retort, only answering with another entreaty to Mrs. Gummidge to cheer up.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
epiphanyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a manifestation of a divine or supernatural being; twelve days after Christmas
epitomespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. representative or perfect example of a class or type; brief summary, as of a book or article
Mr. Harthouse professed himself in the highest degree instructed and refreshed, by this condensed epitome of the whole Coketown question.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
He hated Ellen O'Hara above anyone else, for she was the epitome of all that he hated in Southerners.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
equanimityspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. calmness of temperament; steadiness of mind under stress.
Miss Bart listened with admirable equanimity.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 7
The little party recovered its equanimity at sight of the fragrant feast.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
He would listen to the most pathetic appeals with the most discouraging politeness and equanimity.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
equilibriumspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. mental or emotional balance; state of balance of any causes, powers, or motives
I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
Selden knew, however, that he could not long keep such violences in equilibrium; and he promised to meet Dorset, the next morning, at an hotel in Monte Carlo.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 3
equivocalspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. open to two or more interpretations and often intended to mislead
On his side the inclination was stronger, on hers less equivocal.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
But there was less equivocal testimony, which the credulity of the assembly, or of the greater part, greedily swallowed, however incredible.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
Thus, all things considered, Haley, with rather an equivocal grace, proceeded to the parlor, while Sam, rolling his eyes after him with unutterable meaning, proceeded gravely with the horses to the stable-yard.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
equivocationspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. intentionally vague or ambiguous; a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
On his side the inclination was stronger, on hers less equivocal.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
But there was less equivocal testimony, which the credulity of the assembly, or of the greater part, greedily swallowed, however incredible.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
Thus, all things considered, Haley, with rather an equivocal grace, proceeded to the parlor, while Sam, rolling his eyes after him with unutterable meaning, proceeded gravely with the horses to the stable-yard.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
eradicatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. completely destroy; eliminate; exterminate
Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilised by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
But unimpressionable natures are not so soon softened, nor are natural antipathies so readily eradicated.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
They know our infantine dispositions, which, however they may be afterwards modified, are never eradicated; and they can judge of our actions with more certain conclusions as to the integrity of our motives.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24