BARSAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Barsad in A Tale of Two Cities
1  I hold another card, Mr. Barsad.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
2  You apprehend me very clearly, Mr. Barsad.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
3  Look over your hand carefully, Mr. Barsad.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
4  Look over your hand, Mr. Barsad, and see what you have.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
5  I wish you had a better employed brother than Mr. Barsad.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
6  Mr. Barsad saw losing cards in it that Sydney Carton knew nothing of.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
7  I play my Ace, Denunciation of Mr. Barsad to the nearest Section Committee.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
8  "I told you you had a remarkable face, Mr. Barsad," observed Carton, coolly.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
9  I lighted on you, Mr. Barsad, coming out of the prison of the Conciergerie while I was contemplating the walls, an hour or more ago.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
10  Mr. Barsad has been recognised by Miss Pross as the affectionate brother you have heard of," said Sydney, "and has acknowledged the relationship.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
11  This is not a good city, at this time, for you to be out in, unprotected; and as your escort knows Mr. Barsad, I will invite him to Mr. Lorry's with us.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
12  Mr. Barsad, now in the employ of the republican French government, was formerly in the employ of the aristocratic English government, the enemy of France and freedom.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
13  Mr. Barsad is the best authority possible, sir," said Sydney, "and I have it from Mr. Barsad's communication to a friend and brother Sheep over a bottle of wine, that the arrest has taken place.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
14  Inference clear as day in this region of suspicion, that Mr. Barsad, still in the pay of the aristocratic English government, is the spy of Pitt, the treacherous foe of the Republic crouching in its bosom, the English traitor and agent of all mischief so much spoken of and so difficult to find.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
15  He had now to attend while Mr. Stryver fitted the prisoner's case on the jury, like a compact suit of clothes; showing them how the patriot, Barsad, was a hired spy and traitor, an unblushing trafficker in blood, and one of the greatest scoundrels upon earth since accursed Judas--which he certainly did look rather like.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
16  Having made, at least, this one hit, whatever it might prove to be worth, and no customers coming in to help him to any other, Mr. Barsad paid for what he had drunk, and took his leave: taking occasion to say, in a genteel manner, before he departed, that he looked forward to the pleasure of seeing Monsieur and Madame Defarge again.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
17  Mr. Barsad," he went on, in the tone of one who really was looking over a hand at cards: "Sheep of the prisons, emissary of Republican committees, now turnkey, now prisoner, always spy and secret informer, so much the more valuable here for being English that an Englishman is less open to suspicion of subornation in those characters than a Frenchman, represents himself to his employers under a false name.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
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