CARTON in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Carton in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Mr. Carton had lounged in, but he made only Two.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
2  Mr. Carton's manner was so careless as to be almost insolent.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
3  Mr. Carton came up at the moment, and touched Mr. Lorry on the arm.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
4  Sydney Carton, idlest and most unpromising of men, was Stryver's great ally.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
5  "I was not present at the ceremony; but my opinion is you were," said Carton.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
6  Lucie sat by her father; Darnay sat beside her; Carton leaned against a window.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
7  Nobody had made any acknowledgment of Mr. Carton's part in the day's proceedings; nobody had known of it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
8  Mr. Carton, who had so long sat looking at the ceiling of the court, changed neither his place nor his attitude, even in this excitement.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
9  Mr. Lorry reddened as if he were conscious of having debated the point in his mind, and Mr. Carton made his way to the outside of the bar.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
10  Before Shrewsbury, and at Shrewsbury, and ever since Shrewsbury," pursued Carton, "you have fallen into your rank, and I have fallen into mine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
11  The old Sydney Carton of old Shrewsbury School," said Stryver, nodding his head over him as he reviewed him in the present and the past, "the old seesaw Sydney.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
12  Looking his companion full in the face while he drank the toast, Carton flung his glass over his shoulder against the wall, where it shivered to pieces; then, rang the bell, and ordered in another.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
13  The more business he got, the greater his power seemed to grow of getting at its pith and marrow; and however late at night he sat carousing with Sydney Carton, he always had his points at his fingers' ends in the morning.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
14  At last, it began to get about, among such as were interested in the matter, that although Sydney Carton would never be a lion, he was an amazingly good jackal, and that he rendered suit and service to Stryver in that humble capacity.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
15  Here, they were shown into a little room, where Charles Darnay was soon recruiting his strength with a good plain dinner and good wine: while Carton sat opposite to him at the same table, with his separate bottle of port before him, and his fully half-insolent manner upon him.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
16  Carton," said his friend, squaring himself at him with a bullying air, as if the fire-grate had been the furnace in which sustained endeavour was forged, and the one delicate thing to be done for the old Sydney Carton of old Shrewsbury School was to shoulder him into it, "your way is, and always was, a lame way.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
17  Stryver never had a case in hand, anywhere, but Carton was there, with his hands in his pockets, staring at the ceiling of the court; they went the same Circuit, and even there they prolonged their usual orgies late into the night, and Carton was rumoured to be seen at broad day, going home stealthily and unsteadily to his lodgings, like a dissipated cat.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
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