LUCIE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Lucie in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Lucie was to be married to-morrow.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
2  Lucie and I have been there; but only casually.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
3  Doctor Manette received him kindly, and so did Lucie.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
4  "My father," said Lucie, softly laying her hand on his.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
5  He had loved Lucie Manette from the hour of his danger.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
6  He was shown up-stairs, and found Lucie at her work, alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy
7  Lucie sat by her father; Darnay sat beside her; Carton leaned against a window.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
8  It was the close of the summer day, and he knew Lucie to be out with Miss Pross.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
9  Walking between her father and Mr. Darnay, Lucie Manette passed into the open air.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
10  If your suit should prosper, if Lucie should love you, you shall tell me on your marriage morning.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
11  Lucie, I recall these old troubles in the reason that I have to-night for loving you better than words can tell, and thanking God for my great happiness.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
12  It was an oppressive day, and, after dinner, Lucie proposed that the wine should be carried out under the plane-tree, and they should sit there in the air.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
13  The resemblance between him and Lucie was very strong at such times, and as they sat side by side, she leaning on his shoulder, and he resting his arm on the back of her chair, it was very agreeable to trace the likeness.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
14  The Doctor was a pleasant sight too, looking on at them, and telling Miss Pross how she spoilt Lucie, in accents and with eyes that had as much spoiling in them as Miss Pross had, and would have had more if it were possible.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
15  It was dark when Charles Darnay left him, and it was an hour later and darker when Lucie came home; she hurried into the room alone--for Miss Pross had gone straight up-stairs--and was surprised to find his reading-chair empty.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
16  He was so unlike what he had ever shown himself to be, and it was so sad to think how much he had thrown away, and how much he every day kept down and perverted, that Lucie Manette wept mournfully for him as he stood looking back at her.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy
17  From the dimly-lighted passages of the court, the last sediment of the human stew that had been boiling there all day, was straining off, when Doctor Manette, Lucie Manette, his daughter, Mr. Lorry, the solicitor for the defence, and its counsel, Mr. Stryver, stood gathered round Mr. Charles Darnay--just released--congratulating him on his escape from death.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.