MADAME DEFARGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Madame Defarge in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Soon, Madame Defarge's hands ceased to strike, and felt at her encircled waist.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
2  Still, Madame Defarge, pursuing her way along the streets, came nearer and nearer.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
3  Thus engaged, with her right elbow supported by her left hand, Madame Defarge said nothing when her lord came in, but coughed just one grain of cough.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
4  Jacques Three was nearly at his side; Madame Defarge, still heading some of her women, was visible in the inner distance, and her knife was in her hand.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
5  In a word," Madame Defarge went on, "my husband has not my reason for pursuing this family to annihilation, and I have not his reason for regarding this Doctor with any sensibility.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
6  When this interchange of Christian name was effected, Madame Defarge, picking her teeth with her toothpick, coughed another grain of cough, and raised her eyebrows by the breadth of another line.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
7  At this second interchange of the Christian name, Madame Defarge, still using her toothpick with profound composure, coughed another grain of cough, and raised her eyebrows by the breadth of another line.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
8  Thus accoutred, and walking with the confident tread of such a character, and with the supple freedom of a woman who had habitually walked in her girlhood, bare-foot and bare-legged, on the brown sea-sand, Madame Defarge took her way along the streets.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
9  Games at cards languished, players at dominoes musingly built towers with them, drinkers drew figures on the tables with spilt drops of wine, Madame Defarge herself picked out the pattern on her sleeve with her toothpick, and saw and heard something inaudible and invisible a long way off.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
10  My dear," said Mr. Lorry, striking in to explain; "there are frequent risings in the streets; and, although it is not likely they will ever trouble you, Madame Defarge wishes to see those whom she has the power to protect at such times, to the end that she may know them--that she may identify them.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III. The Shadow