HEARING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Hearing in A Tale of Two Cities
1  There was a heavy lumbering of wheels within hearing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V. The Wood-Sawyer
2  It was the first time, except at the trial, of her ever hearing him refer to the period of his suffering.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
3  He was half way through it, when he again stopped with his glass in his hand, hearing the sound of wheels.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
4  Before that unjust Tribunal, there was little or no order of procedure, ensuring to any accused person any reasonable hearing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX. The Game Made
5  On hearing footsteps close at hand, these three turned, and rose, and showed themselves to be the three of one name who had been drinking in the wine-shop.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
6  After standing with the bridle over his heavily-splashed arm, until the wheels of the mail were no longer within hearing and the night was quite still again, he turned to walk down the hill.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
7  Stooping again to come out at the low-arched door, they left it burning, and retraced their way to the courtyard; seeming to recover their sense of hearing as they came down, until they were in the raging flood once more.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
8  The words were still in his hearing as just spoken--distinctly in his hearing as ever spoken words had been in his life--when the weary passenger started to the consciousness of daylight, and found that the shadows of the night were gone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
9  Hemmed in here by the massive thickness of walls and arches, the storm within the fortress and without was only audible to them in a dull, subdued way, as if the noise out of which they had come had almost destroyed their sense of hearing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
10  Nor was this the end of the day's bad work, for Saint Antoine so shouted and danced his angry blood up, that it boiled again, on hearing when the day closed in that the son-in-law of the despatched, another of the people's enemies and insulters, was coming into Paris under a guard five hundred strong, in cavalry alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXII. The Sea Still Rises