LEAVES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Leaves in Persuasion
1  It will be a great deal better than leaving him only with Jemima.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  His enquiries, however, produced at length an account of the scene she had been engaged in there, soon after his leaving the place.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
3  He would be as little incumbrance as possible to Captain and Mrs Harville; but as to leaving his sister in such a state, he neither ought, nor would.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
4  The subjects of which her heart had been full on leaving Kellynch, and which she had felt slighted, and been compelled to smother among the Musgroves, were now become but of secondary interest.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
5  "Oh no; as to leaving the little boy," both father and mother were in much too strong and recent alarm to bear the thought; and Anne, in the joy of the escape, could not help adding her warm protestations to theirs.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  There she had listened to Henrietta's schemes for Dr Shirley's leaving Uppercross; farther on, she had first seen Mr Elliot; a moment seemed all that could now be given to any one but Louisa, or those who were wrapt up in her welfare.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
7  This was against her; but on the other hand, he spent so much of his time at Uppercross, that in removing thence she might be considered rather as leaving him behind, than as going towards him; and, upon the whole, she believed she must, on this interesting question, be the gainer, almost as certainly as in her change of domestic society, in leaving poor Mary for Lady Russell.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11