MR. LORRY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Mr. Lorry in A Tale of Two Cities
1  "I hope she will do well now," said Mr. Lorry.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
2  Mr. Lorry quietly chafed the hands that held his arm.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
3  I was happy," said Mr. Lorry, "to be entrusted with the charge.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
4  When Mr. Lorry had finished his breakfast, he went out for a stroll on the beach.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
5  Thus, Monsieur Defarge, in a stern voice, to Mr. Lorry, as they began ascending the stairs.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
6  Completing his resemblance to a man who was sitting for his portrait, Mr. Lorry dropped off to sleep.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
7  Mr. Lorry's spirits grew heavier and heavier, as he and his two companions ascended higher and higher.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
8  Mr. Lorry moved in his chair, and cast a troubled look towards the hospital procession of negro cupids.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
9  Mr. Lorry took the hesitating little hand that confidingly advanced to take his, and he put it with some ceremony to his lips.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
10  "I kiss your hand, miss," said Mr. Lorry, with the manners of an earlier date, as he made his formal bow again, and took his seat.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
11  Mr. Lorry, the passenger, shaking himself out of it in chains of straw, a tangle of shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather like a larger sort of dog.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
12  Only one thing more," said Mr. Lorry, laying stress upon it as a wholesome means of enforcing her attention: "he has been found under another name; his own, long forgotten or long concealed.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
13  As the day declined into the afternoon, and the air, which had been at intervals clear enough to allow the French coast to be seen, became again charged with mist and vapour, Mr. Lorry's thoughts seemed to cloud too.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
14  Pray," said Mr. Lorry, in a soothing tone, bringing his left hand from the back of the chair to lay it on the supplicatory fingers that clasped him in so violent a tremble: "pray control your agitation--a matter of business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
15  "I know this messenger, guard," said Mr. Lorry, getting down into the road--assisted from behind more swiftly than politely by the other two passengers, who immediately scrambled into the coach, shut the door, and pulled up the window.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
16  The keeper of the wine-shop, always going a little in advance, and always going on the side which Mr. Lorry took, as though he dreaded to be asked any question by the young lady, turned himself about here, and, carefully feeling in the pockets of the coat he carried over his shoulder, took out a key.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
17  Mr. Lorry had been idle a long time, and had just poured out his last glassful of wine with as complete an appearance of satisfaction as is ever to be found in an elderly gentleman of a fresh complexion who has got to the end of a bottle, when a rattling of wheels came up the narrow street, and rumbled into the inn-yard.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
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