POWER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Power in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Only his daughter had the power of charming this black brooding from his mind.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
2  For the first time the Doctor felt, now, that his suffering was strength and power.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
3  Monseigneur, one of the great lords in power at the Court, held his fortnightly reception in his grand hotel in Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
4  My old pain has given me a power that has brought us through the barrier, and gained us news of Charles there, and brought us here.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II. The Grindstone
5  In both, there were several knots of loungers, squalid and miserable, but now with a manifest sense of power enthroned on their distress.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXII. The Sea Still Rises
6  Not absolutely always, for she could recall some occasions on which her power had failed; but they were few and slight, and she believed them over.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
7  If you are sure of what you say; if you really have the power you think you have--as I believe you have--make yourself known to these devils, and get taken to La Force.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II. The Grindstone
8  As a wife and mother," cried Lucie, most earnestly, "I implore you to have pity on me and not to exercise any power that you possess, against my innocent husband, but to use it in his behalf.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III. The Shadow
9  These little instruments of correction, these gentle aids to the power and honour of families, these slight favours that might so incommode you, are only to be obtained now by interest and importunity.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
10  Among these terrors, and the brood belonging to them, the Doctor walked with a steady head: confident in his power, cautiously persistent in his end, never doubting that he would save Lucie's husband at last.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
11  The more business he got, the greater his power seemed to grow of getting at its pith and marrow; and however late at night he sat carousing with Sydney Carton, he always had his points at his fingers' ends in the morning.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
12  Monseigneur had one truly noble idea of general public business, which was, to let everything go on in its own way; of particular public business, Monseigneur had the other truly noble idea that it must all go his way--tend to his own power and pocket.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
13  "One cannot help thinking, having had some sympathy for the miserable people, and having abandoned something to them," he spoke here in his former thoughtful manner, "that one might be listened to, and might have the power to persuade to some restraint."
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
14  My dear," said Mr. Lorry, striking in to explain; "there are frequent risings in the streets; and, although it is not likely they will ever trouble you, Madame Defarge wishes to see those whom she has the power to protect at such times, to the end that she may know them--that she may identify them.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III. The Shadow
15  And now that the cloud settled on Saint Antoine, which a momentary gleam had driven from his sacred countenance, the darkness of it was heavy--cold, dirt, sickness, ignorance, and want, were the lords in waiting on the saintly presence--nobles of great power all of them; but, most especially the last.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
16  Another darkness was closing in as surely, when the church bells, then ringing pleasantly in many an airy steeple over France, should be melted into thundering cannon; when the military drums should be beating to drown a wretched voice, that night all potent as the voice of Power and Plenty, Freedom and Life.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
17  That, the evidence of these two witnesses, coupled with the documents of their discovering that would be produced, would show the prisoner to have been furnished with lists of his Majesty's forces, and of their disposition and preparation, both by sea and land, and would leave no doubt that he had habitually conveyed such information to a hostile power.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
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