PRAYER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Prayer in A Tale of Two Cities
1  My picture was in her room, and I was in her prayers.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
2  Every stone of its inner wall was covered by inscriptions which had been carved by prisoners--dates, names, complaints, and prayers.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
3  The devoutest person could have rendered no greater homage to the efficacy of an honest prayer than he did in this distrust of his wife.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
4  In the church and at the Cross, a kneeling figure or two; attendant on the latter prayers, the led cow, trying for a breakfast among the weeds at its foot.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
5  She timidly laid her hand on his dear breast, and put up a prayer that she might ever be as true to him as her love aspired to be, and as his sorrows deserved.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
6  As he was drawn away, his wife released him, and stood looking after him with her hands touching one another in the attitude of prayer, and with a radiant look upon her face, in which there was even a comforting smile.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XI. Dusk
7  The slight devices with which she cheated herself into the show of a belief that they would soon be reunited--the little preparations for his speedy return, the setting aside of his chair and his books--these, and the solemn prayer at night for one dear prisoner especially, among the many unhappy souls in prison and the shadow of death--were almost the only outspoken reliefs of her heavy mind.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V. The Wood-Sawyer