SOHO in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Soho in A Tale of Two Cities
1  On this certain fine Sunday, Mr. Lorry walked towards Soho, early in the afternoon, for three reasons of habit.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
2  Towards Soho, therefore, Mr. Stryver shouldered his way from the Temple, while the bloom of the Long Vacation's infancy was still upon it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy
3  Never did the sun go down with a brighter glory on the quiet corner in Soho, than one memorable evening when the Doctor and his daughter sat under the plane-tree together.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
4  It was again a summer day when, lately arrived in London from his college occupation, he turned into the quiet corner in Soho, bent on seeking an opportunity of opening his mind to Doctor Manette.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
5  There were solitary patches of road on the way between Soho and Clerkenwell, and Mr. Lorry, mindful of foot-pads, always retained Jerry for this service: though it was usually performed a good two hours earlier.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
6  Miss Pross's friendship being of the thoroughly practical kind, she had ravaged Soho and the adjacent provinces, in search of impoverished French, who, tempted by shillings and half-crowns, would impart culinary mysteries to her.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
7  His way taking him past Tellson's, and he both banking at Tellson's and knowing Mr. Lorry as the intimate friend of the Manettes, it entered Mr. Stryver's mind to enter the bank, and reveal to Mr. Lorry the brightness of the Soho horizon.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy
8  Anybody who had seen him projecting himself into Soho while he was yet on Saint Dunstan's side of Temple Bar, bursting in his full-blown way along the pavement, to the jostlement of all weaker people, might have seen how safe and strong he was.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy
9  As a consequence, country airs circulated in Soho with vigorous freedom, instead of languishing into the parish like stray paupers without a settlement; and there was many a good south wall, not far off, on which the peaches ripened in their season.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
10  Accordingly, Mr. Stryver inaugurated the Long Vacation with a formal proposal to take Miss Manette to Vauxhall Gardens; that failing, to Ranelagh; that unaccountably failing too, it behoved him to present himself in Soho, and there declare his noble mind.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy