STREETS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Streets in A Tale of Two Cities
1  A large cask of wine had been dropped and broken, in the street.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
2  However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
3  The fountain was a little removed; for the street opened, where it was, into a space some ten or twelve yards square.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
4  No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passerby was in the street.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
5  The wine was red wine, and had stained the ground of the narrow street in the suburb of Saint Antoine, in Paris, where it was spilled.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
6  A shrill sound of laughter and of amused voices--voices of men, women, and children--resounded in the street while this wine game lasted.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
7  They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II. A Sight
8  There was no way through it, and the front windows of the Doctor's lodgings commanded a pleasant little vista of street that had a congenial air of retirement on it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
9  At last, swooping at a street corner by a fountain, one of its wheels came to a sickening little jolt, and there was a loud cry from a number of voices, and the horses reared and plunged.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
10  A narrow winding street, full of offence and stench, with other narrow winding streets diverging, all peopled by rags and nightcaps, and all smelling of rags and nightcaps, and all visible things with a brooding look upon them that looked ill.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
11  On their reaching the courtyard he instinctively altered his tread, as being in expectation of a drawbridge; and when there was no drawbridge, and he saw the carriage waiting in the open street, he dropped his daughter's hand and clasped his head again.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
12  There was no drainage to carry off the wine, and not only did it all get taken up, but so much mud got taken up along with it, that there might have been a scavenger in the street, if anybody acquainted with it could have believed in such a miraculous presence.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
13  The rough, irregular stones of the street, pointing every way, and designed, one might have thought, expressly to lame all living creatures that approached them, had dammed it into little pools; these were surrounded, each by its own jostling group or crowd, according to its size.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
14  For the rest, the Old Bailey was famous as a kind of deadly inn-yard, from which pale travellers set out continually, in carts and coaches, on a violent passage into the other world: traversing some two miles and a half of public street and road, and shaming few good citizens, if any.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II. A Sight
15  He had no opportunity of saying, or so much as thinking, anything else, until he was clear of the Old Bailey; for, the crowd came pouring out with a vehemence that nearly took him off his legs, and a loud buzz swept into the street as if the baffled blue-flies were dispersing in search of other carrion.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
16  The garret, built to be a depository for firewood and the like, was dim and dark: for, the window of dormer shape, was in truth a door in the roof, with a little crane over it for the hoisting up of stores from the street: unglazed, and closing up the middle in two pieces, like any other door of French construction.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
17  Mr. Lorry had been idle a long time, and had just poured out his last glassful of wine with as complete an appearance of satisfaction as is ever to be found in an elderly gentleman of a fresh complexion who has got to the end of a bottle, when a rattling of wheels came up the narrow street, and rumbled into the inn-yard.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
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