ALONE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - alone in A Tale of Two Cities
1  In short, must leave it alone, like or no like.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
2  He was shown up-stairs, and found Lucie at her work, alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy
3  A honouring and obeying wife would let his trade alone altogether.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
4  She had reserved this last evening for her father, and they sat alone under the plane-tree.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
5  Mr. Lorry and Charles Darnay were left alone at the desk, in the general departure from the Bank.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
6  In a quarter of an hour Monseigneur was ready, and sat down alone to his sumptuous and choice supper.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
7  When he was left alone, this strange being took up a candle, went to a glass that hung against the wall, and surveyed himself minutely in it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
8  He had been days upon his journey in France alone, when he went to bed tired out, in a little town on the high road, still a long way from Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I. In Secret
9  The corner being out of the way of the idle and curious, and the preparations having been very simple and few, the Doctor, Mr. Lorry, and Miss Pross, were left quite alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
10  When coffee had been served and they were alone together, the nephew, looking at the uncle and meeting the eyes of the face that was like a fine mask, opened a conversation.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
11  Jacques," returned Defarge, drawing himself up, "if madame my wife undertook to keep the register in her memory alone, she would not lose a word of it--not a syllable of it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
12  When he came back, he ascended the old staircase alone, having asked no question of the servant; going thus into the Doctor's rooms, he was stopped by a low sound of knocking.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
13  Here and there, especially at first, the inundation started on them and swept by; but when they had done descending, and were winding and climbing up a tower, they were alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
14  Jerry, left alone in the mist and darkness, dismounted meanwhile, not only to ease his spent horse, but to wipe the mud from his face, and shake the wet out of his hat-brim, which might be capable of holding about half a gallon.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
15  Such a scanty portion of light was admitted through these means, that it was difficult, on first coming in, to see anything; and long habit alone could have slowly formed in any one, the ability to do any work requiring nicety in such obscurity.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
16  Nor was this the end of the day's bad work, for Saint Antoine so shouted and danced his angry blood up, that it boiled again, on hearing when the day closed in that the son-in-law of the despatched, another of the people's enemies and insulters, was coming into Paris under a guard five hundred strong, in cavalry alone.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXII. The Sea Still Rises
17  Monsieur Gabelle, chief functionary of the place, became uneasy; went out on his house-top alone, and looked in that direction too; glanced down from behind his chimneys at the darkening faces by the fountain below, and sent word to the sacristan who kept the keys of the church, that there might be need to ring the tocsin by-and-bye.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
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