BROTHER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - brother in A Tale of Two Cities
1  "Miss Pross's brother, sir," said Sydney.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
2  I wish you had a better employed brother than Mr. Barsad.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
3  We must hold up our heads and fight low, as my brother Solomon used to say.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII. A Knock at the Door
4  Then, I tracked the brother here, and last night climbed in--a common dog, but sword in hand.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
5  "I could not better testify my respect for your sister than by finally relieving her of her brother," said Sydney Carton.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
6  In the days when all these things are to be answered for, I summon your brother, the worst of the bad race, to answer for them separately.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
7  If you expect me to be surprised," said her brother Solomon, "I am not surprised; I knew you were here; I know of most people who are here.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
8  As often as I caught the younger brother's eyes, their expression reminded me that he disliked me deeply, for knowing what I knew from the boy.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
9  Mr. Barsad has been recognised by Miss Pross as the affectionate brother you have heard of," said Sydney, "and has acknowledged the relationship.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
10  She was too much occupied then with fears for the brother who so little deserved her affection, and with Sydney's friendly reassurances, adequately to heed what she observed.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
11  Mr. Barsad is the best authority possible, sir," said Sydney, "and I have it from Mr. Barsad's communication to a friend and brother Sheep over a bottle of wine, that the arrest has taken place.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
12  As I turned my eyes to the elder brother, I saw him looking down at this handsome boy whose life was ebbing out, as if he were a wounded bird, or hare, or rabbit; not at all as if he were a fellow-creature.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
13  I connected the title by which the boy had addressed the elder brother, with the initial letter embroidered on the scarf, and had no difficulty in arriving at the conclusion that I had seen that nobleman very lately.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
14  At the gallows and the wheel--the axe was a rarity--Monsieur Paris, as it was the episcopal mode among his brother Professors of the provinces, Monsieur Orleans, and the rest, to call him, presided in this dainty dress.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
15  I arrived at Mr. Lorry's, to his surprise, yesterday evening; we agreed that I would not present myself elsewhere until all was well, or unless I could be useful; I present myself here, to beg a little talk with your brother.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
16  They were ready to go to church; the beautiful bride, Mr. Lorry, and Miss Pross--to whom the event, through a gradual process of reconcilement to the inevitable, would have been one of absolute bliss, but for the yet lingering consideration that her brother Solomon should have been the bridegroom.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
17  Here again: Mr. Lorry's inquiries into Miss Pross's personal history had established the fact that her brother Solomon was a heartless scoundrel who had stripped her of everything she possessed, as a stake to speculate with, and had abandoned her in her poverty for evermore, with no touch of compunction.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
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