BUSINESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - business in A Tale of Two Cities
1  I am going to Paris on business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
2  Miss Manette, I am a man of business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
3  I have a business charge to acquit myself of.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
4  Our relations were business relations, but confidential.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
5  This was no passive belief, but an active weapon which they flashed at more convenient places of business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I. Five Years Later
6  All the people within reach had suspended their business, or their idleness, to run to the spot and drink the wine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
7  These are mere business relations, miss; there is no friendship in them, no particular interest, nothing like sentiment.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
8  No; you have been the ward of Tellson's House since, and I have been busy with the other business of Tellson's House since.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
9  It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
10  It was told me by the Bank that the gentleman would explain to me the details of the business, and that I must prepare myself to find them of a surprising nature.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
11  He seemed wilfully to mistake the word she had repeated, when he added, in a hurry, "Yes, customers; in the banking business we usually call our connection our customers."
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
12  Small tradesmen, who did no business whatever, sometimes unaccountably realised large fortunes, and it was remarkable that nobody in the neighbourhood could endure a lamplighter.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
13  The real Banking-house by Temple Bar, the real business of the past day, the real strong rooms, the real express sent after him, and the real message returned, would all be there.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
14  I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
15  And you will see how truly I spoke of myself just now, in saying I had no feelings, and that all the relations I hold with my fellow-creatures are mere business relations, when you reflect that I have never seen you since.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
16  Pray," said Mr. Lorry, in a soothing tone, bringing his left hand from the back of the chair to lay it on the supplicatory fingers that clasped him in so violent a tremble: "pray control your agitation--a matter of business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
17  But, as there were not only carriage and horses to be seen to, but travelling papers; and as time pressed, for the day was drawing to an end, it came at last to their hastily dividing the business that was necessary to be done, and hurrying away to do it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
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