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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - drive in A Tale of Two Cities
1  You were always driving and riving and shouldering and passing, to that restless degree that I had no chance for my life but in rust and repose.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
2  In the roaring and raging of the conflagration, a red-hot wind, driving straight from the infernal regions, seemed to be blowing the edifice away.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
3  In this state they set forth with the sharp rain driving in their faces: clattering at a heavy dragoon trot over the uneven town pavement, and out upon the mire-deep roads.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I. In Secret
4  The same shadows that are falling on the prison, are falling, in that same hour of the early afternoon, on the Barrier with the crowd about it, when a coach going out of Paris drives up to be examined.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
5  He and the mender of roads sat on the heap of stones looking silently at one another, with the hail driving in between them like a pigmy charge of bayonets, until the sky began to clear over the village.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
6  The complaint had sometimes made itself audible, even in that deaf city and dumb age, that, in the narrow streets without footways, the fierce patrician custom of hard driving endangered and maimed the mere vulgar in a barbarous manner.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
7  The remodelled procession started, with a chimney-sweep driving the hearse--advised by the regular driver, who was perched beside him, under close inspection, for the purpose--and with a pieman, also attended by his cabinet minister, driving the mourning coach.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman