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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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1  When the plan was made known to Mary, however, there was an end of all peace in it.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
2  But it was not a merely selfish caution, under which she acted, in putting an end to it.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
3  It was a little fever of admiration; but it might, probably must, end in love with some.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
4  He has walked with me, sometimes, from one end of the sands to the other, without saying a word.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
5  Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot's character; vanity of person and of situation.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
6  I would assist any brother officer's wife that I could, and I would bring anything of Harville's from the world's end, if he wanted it.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
7  A few months had seen the beginning and the end of their acquaintance; but not with a few months ended Anne's share of suffering from it.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
8  It suited Mary best to think Henrietta the one preferred on the very account of Charles Hayter, whose pretensions she wished to see put an end to.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  Then, forgetting to think of it, she was at the other end of the room, beautifying a nosegay; then, she ate her cold meat; and then she was well enough to propose a little walk.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
10  The half hour was chatted away pleasantly enough; and she was not at all surprised at the end of it, to have their walking party joined by both the Miss Musgroves, at Mary's particular invitation.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
11  At the end of that period, Lady Russell's politeness could repose no longer, and the fainter self-threatenings of the past became in a decided tone, "I must call on Mrs Croft; I really must call upon her soon."
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
12  A very few days more, and Captain Wentworth was known to be at Kellynch, and Mr Musgrove had called on him, and come back warm in his praise, and he was engaged with the Crofts to dine at Uppercross, by the end of another week.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
13  Captain Wentworth, however, came from his window, apparently not ill-disposed for conversation; but Charles Hayter soon put an end to his attempts by seating himself near the table, and taking up the newspaper; and Captain Wentworth returned to his window.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
14  Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone, the Miss Musgroves were gone too, suddenly resolving to walk to the end of the village with the sportsmen: the room was cleared, and Anne might finish her breakfast as she could.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  This long meadow bordered a lane, which their footpath, at the end of it was to cross, and when the party had all reached the gate of exit, the carriage advancing in the same direction, which had been some time heard, was just coming up, and proved to be Admiral Croft's gig.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
16  However it might end, he was without any question their pleasantest acquaintance in Bath: she saw nobody equal to him; and it was a great indulgence now and then to talk to him about Lyme, which he seemed to have as lively a wish to see again, and to see more of, as herself.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
17  That he did not regard it as a desperate case, that he did not say a few hours must end it, was at first felt, beyond the hope of most; and the ecstasy of such a reprieve, the rejoicing, deep and silent, after a few fervent ejaculations of gratitude to Heaven had been offered, may be conceived.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
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