FELICITY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - felicity in Persuasion
1  A short period of exquisite felicity followed, and but a short one.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
2  Anne could do no more; but her heart prophesied some mischance to damp the perfection of her felicity.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
3  Her spring of felicity was in the glow of her spirits, as her friend Anne's was in the warmth of her heart.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
4  An interval of meditation, serious and grateful, was the best corrective of everything dangerous in such high-wrought felicity; and she went to her room, and grew steadfast and fearless in the thankfulness of her enjoyment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
5  Anne wondered whether it ever occurred to him now, to question the justness of his own previous opinion as to the universal felicity and advantage of firmness of character; and whether it might not strike him that, like all other qualities of the mind, it should have its proportions and limits.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
6  He was steady, observant, moderate, candid; never run away with by spirits or by selfishness, which fancied itself strong feeling; and yet, with a sensibility to what was amiable and lovely, and a value for all the felicities of domestic life, which characters of fancied enthusiasm and violent agitation seldom really possess.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
7  Elizabeth arm in arm with Miss Carteret, and looking on the broad back of the dowager Viscountess Dalrymple before her, had nothing to wish for which did not seem within her reach; and Anne--but it would be an insult to the nature of Anne's felicity, to draw any comparison between it and her sister's; the origin of one all selfish vanity, of the other all generous attachment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20