HANGING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - hanging in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Got out at last, with earth hanging about his face and hair, he would suddenly fan away to dust.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
2  Some thick old hangings had been nailed up before the windows, to deaden the sound of the shrieks.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
3  They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II. A Sight
4  I saw him then, messieurs," began the mender of roads, "a year ago this running summer, underneath the carriage of the Marquis, hanging by the chain.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
5  He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
6  He wore the white riding-coat and top-boots, then in vogue, and the light of the fire touching their light surfaces made him look very pale, with his long brown hair, all untrimmed, hanging loose about him.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX. The Game Made
7  They leisurely walk round the carriage and leisurely mount the box, to look at what little luggage it carries on the roof; the country-people hanging about, press nearer to the coach doors and greedily stare in; a little child, carried by its mother, has its short arm held out for it, that it may touch the wife of an aristocrat who has gone to the Guillotine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
8  Some of his King's Bench familiars, who were occasionally parties to the full-bodied wine and the lie, excused him for the latter by saying that he had told it so often, that he believed it himself--which is surely such an incorrigible aggravation of an originally bad offence, as to justify any such offender's being carried off to some suitably retired spot, and there hanged out of the way.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps