HAPPY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - happy in A Tale of Two Cities
1  And I am very happy to-night, dear father.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
2  This answer had a happy effect upon the audience.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI. Triumph
3  I was happy," said Mr. Lorry, "to be entrusted with the charge.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
4  She was a good, compassionate lady, and not happy in her marriage.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
5  I am deeply happy in the love that Heaven has so blessed--my love for Charles, and Charles's love for me.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
6  If the Republic demands sacrifices from you, without doubt you as a good patriot will be happy to make them.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII. A Knock at the Door
7  He was happy in the return he had made her, he was recompensed for his suffering, he was proud of his strength.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI. Triumph
8  I see the lives for which I lay down my life, peaceful, useful, prosperous and happy, in that England which I shall see no more.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever
9  At first, there were times, though she was a perfectly happy young wife, when her work would slowly fall from her hands, and her eyes would be dimmed.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
10  In a very few minutes the waiter came in to announce that Miss Manette had arrived from London, and would be happy to see the gentleman from Tellson's.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
11  The plain dark dresses, akin to mourning dresses, which she and her child wore, were as neat and as well attended to as the brighter clothes of happy days.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V. The Wood-Sawyer
12  Bestowing a word of promise here and a smile there, a whisper on one happy slave and a wave of the hand on another, Monseigneur affably passed through his rooms to the remote region of the Circumference of Truth.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
13  He walked on the other side of it and protected it to the courtyard of the house where the afflicted heart--so happy in the memorable time when he had revealed his own desolate heart to it--outwatched the awful night.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
14  Ever busily winding the golden thread that bound them all together, weaving the service of her happy influence through the tissue of all their lives, and making it predominate nowhere, Lucie heard in the echoes of years none but friendly and soothing sounds.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
15  It took four men, all four ablaze with gorgeous decoration, and the Chief of them unable to exist with fewer than two gold watches in his pocket, emulative of the noble and chaste fashion set by Monseigneur, to conduct the happy chocolate to Monseigneur's lips.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
16  But, do not believe," said Darnay, upon whose ear the mournful voice struck with a reproachful sound, "that if my fortune were so cast as that, being one day so happy as to make her my wife, I must at any time put any separation between her and you, I could or would breathe a word of what I now say.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
17  The secret was well kept, and Lucie was unconscious and happy; but he could not fail to observe that the shoemaker, whose hand had been a little out at first, was growing dreadfully skilful, and that he had never been so intent on his work, and that his hands had never been so nimble and expert, as in the dusk of the ninth evening.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
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