HEALTH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - health in A Tale of Two Cities
1  But the life I lead, Miss Manette, is not conducive to health.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy
2  It is represented that he is not in strong health, and has separated sadly from a friend who is under the displeasure of the Republic.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
3  When the prisoner came on board, he noticed that my father," turning her eyes lovingly to him as he stood beside her, "was much fatigued and in a very weak state of health.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
4  Brief as such companionship was in every separate instance, Mr. Cruncher never failed to become so interested in the lady as to express a strong desire to have the honour of drinking her very good health.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
5  And when, at the fortnight's end, he comes to join you and your beloved husband, on your other fortnight's trip in Wales, you shall say that we have sent him to you in the best health and in the happiest frame.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
6  There was a special companionship in it, an observable inclination on the part of every one to join some other one, which led, especially among the luckier or lighter-hearted, to frolicsome embraces, drinking of healths, shaking of hands, and even joining of hands and dancing, a dozen together.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
7  Whether his meditations on mortality had touched his liver, or whether his general health had been previously at all amiss, or whether he desired to show a little attention to an eminent man, is not so much to the purpose, as that he made a short call upon his medical adviser--a distinguished surgeon--on his way back.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman