HUMANITY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - humanity in A Tale of Two Cities
1  There was no touch of pity, sorrow, or kindred humanity, in this answer.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
2  All the human breath in the place, rolled at him, like a sea, or a wind, or a fire.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II. A Sight
3  The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance upon Monseigneur.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
4  For three heavy hours, the stone faces of the chateau, lion and human, stared blindly at the night.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
5  No human intelligence could have read the mysteries of his mind, in the scared blank wonder of his face.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
6  The sort of interest with which this man was stared and breathed at, was not a sort that elevated humanity.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II. A Sight
7  Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever
8  A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
9  Even in my father's time, we did a world of wrong, injuring every human creature who came between us and our pleasure, whatever it was.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
10  So entirely had it lost the life and resonance of the human voice, that it affected the senses like a once beautiful colour faded away into a poor weak stain.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
11  Exquisite gentlemen of the finest breeding, which was at that remarkable time--and has been since--to be known by its fruits of indifference to every natural subject of human interest, were in the most exemplary state of exhaustion, at the hotel of Monseigneur.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
12  Her manner was one of passionate grief; by turns she clasped her veinous and knotted hands together with wild energy, and laid one of them on the carriage-door--tenderly, caressingly, as if it had been a human breast, and could be expected to feel the appealing touch.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
13  His latent uneasiness had been, that bad aims were being worked out in his own unhappy land by bad instruments, and that he who could not fail to know that he was better than they, was not there, trying to do something to stay bloodshed, and assert the claims of mercy and humanity.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
14  Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications yet received through any of the chickens of the Cock-lane brood.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I. The Period
15  When the quiet of the garret had been long undisturbed, and his heaving breast and shaken form had long yielded to the calm that must follow all storms--emblem to humanity, of the rest and silence into which the storm called Life must hush at last--they came forward to raise the father and daughter from the ground.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
16  From the dimly-lighted passages of the court, the last sediment of the human stew that had been boiling there all day, was straining off, when Doctor Manette, Lucie Manette, his daughter, Mr. Lorry, the solicitor for the defence, and its counsel, Mr. Stryver, stood gathered round Mr. Charles Darnay--just released--congratulating him on his escape from death.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
17  He was not missed; for, nobody who crossed the threshold looked for him, nobody asked for him, nobody wondered to see only Madame Defarge in her seat, presiding over the distribution of wine, with a bowl of battered small coins before her, as much defaced and beaten out of their original impress as the small coinage of humanity from whose ragged pockets they had come.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
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