KNITTING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - knitting in A Tale of Two Cities
1  She said, however, that the cognac was flattered, and took up her knitting.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
2  But the woman who stood knitting looked up steadily, and looked the Marquis in the face.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
3  Her knitting was before her, but she had laid it down to pick her teeth with a toothpick.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
4  Madame Defarge poured it out for him, took to her knitting again, and hummed a little song over it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
5  Next noontide saw the admirable woman in her usual place in the wine-shop, knitting away assiduously.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
6  She laid down her knitting, and began to pin her rose in her head-dress, before she looked at the figure.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
7  Only one soul was to be seen, and that was Madame Defarge--who leaned against the door-post, knitting, and saw nothing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
8  He looked at no one present, and no one now looked at him; not even Madame Defarge, who had taken up her knitting, and was at work.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
9  She quickly brought them down and handed them in;--and immediately afterwards leaned against the door-post, knitting, and saw nothing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
10  Madame Defarge immediately called to her husband that she would get them, and went, knitting, out of the lamplight, through the courtyard.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
11  She rolled up her knitting when she had said those words, and presently took the rose out of the handkerchief that was wound about her head.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
12  The eyes of Monsieur Defarge were studying his wife at her knitting when the elderly gentleman advanced from his corner, and begged the favour of a word.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
13  Then she glanced in a casual manner round the wine-shop, took up her knitting with great apparent calmness and repose of spirit, and became absorbed in it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
14  Darkness closed around, and then came the ringing of church bells and the distant beating of the military drums in the Palace Courtyard, as the women sat knitting, knitting.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
15  He looked to the spot where Defarge the vendor of wine had stood, a moment before; but the wretched father was grovelling on his face on the pavement in that spot, and the figure that stood beside him was the figure of a dark stout woman, knitting.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
16  It was additionally disconcerting to have madame knitting all the way there, in a public conveyance; it was additionally disconcerting yet, to have madame in the crowd in the afternoon, still with her knitting in her hands as the crowd waited to see the carriage of the King and Queen.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
17  The father had long ago taken up his bundle and bidden himself away with it, when the women who had tended the bundle while it lay on the base of the fountain, sat there watching the running of the water and the rolling of the Fancy Ball--when the one woman who had stood conspicuous, knitting, still knitted on with the steadfastness of Fate.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
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