MONEY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - money in A Tale of Two Cities
1  He had before offered me money, which I had postponed taking.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
2  "You are fatigued," said madame, raising her glance as she knotted the money.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
3  He came in and first tossed me some pieces of money; then struck at me with a whip.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
4  You have money, and can buy the means of travelling to the seacoast as quickly as the journey can be made.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
5  He put them, one by one, in the breast of his inner coat, counted out the money for them, and deliberately left the shop.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX. The Game Made
6  For some months past, Miss Pross and Mr. Cruncher had discharged the office of purveyors; the former carrying the money; the latter, the basket.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII. A Knock at the Door
7  Your money came out of, or went into, wormy old wooden drawers, particles of which flew up your nose and down your throat when they were opened and shut.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I. Five Years Later
8  Yet, a French Tellson's could get on with these things exceedingly well, and, as long as the times held together, no man had taken fright at them, and drawn out his money.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II. The Grindstone
9  France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, making paper money and spending it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I. The Period
10  The rattle of the harness was the chink of money, and more drafts were honoured in five minutes than even Tellson's, with all its foreign and home connection, ever paid in thrice the time.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
11  Then she turned out the contents of the bowl of money for the second time, and began knotting them up in her handkerchief, in a chain of separate knots, for safe keeping through the night.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
12  If I had had any but a unnat'ral wife, and this poor boy had had any but a unnat'ral mother, I might have made some money last week instead of being counter-prayed and countermined and religiously circumwented into the worst of luck.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I. Five Years Later
13  There had been more of early brooding than drinking; for, many men had listened and whispered and slunk about there from the time of the opening of the door, who could not have laid a piece of money on the counter to save their souls.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
14  Madame enforced the conclusion of this piece of advice by striking her little counter with her chain of money as if she knocked its brains out, and then gathering the heavy handkerchief under her arm in a serene manner, and observing that it was time to go to bed.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
15  Leisurely, our four horses are taken out; leisurely, the coach stands in the little street, bereft of horses, and with no likelihood upon it of ever moving again; leisurely, the new horses come into visible existence, one by one; leisurely, the new postilions follow, sucking and plaiting the lashes of their whips; leisurely, the old postilions count their money, make wrong additions, and arrive at dissatisfied results.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two