NAME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - name in Persuasion
1  I wish I had any name but Elliot.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
2  No; he would never disgrace his name so far.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
3  Ay, ay, Miss Louisa Musgrove, that is the name.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
4  When this was told, his name distressed her no longer.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
5  The name of Anne Elliot," said he, "has long had an interesting sound to me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
6  Everybody of any consequence or notoriety in Bath was well know by name to Mrs Smith.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
7  But first of all, you must tell me the name of the young lady I am going to talk about.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
8  He had never indulged much hope, he had now none, of ever reading her name in any other page of his favourite work.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
9  Lady Dalrymple had acquired the name of "a charming woman," because she had a smile and a civil answer for everybody.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
10  She could not speak the name, and look straight forward to Lady Russell's eye, till she had adopted the expedient of telling her briefly what she thought of the attachment between him and Louisa.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
11  I have often heard him declare, that if baronetcies were saleable, anybody should have his for fifty pounds, arms and motto, name and livery included; but I will not pretend to repeat half that I used to hear him say on that subject.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
12  The idea of becoming what her mother had been; of having the precious name of "Lady Elliot" first revived in herself; of being restored to Kellynch, calling it her home again, her home for ever, was a charm which she could not immediately resist.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
13  Lady Russell had not been arrived five minutes the day before, when a full account of the whole had burst on her; but still it must be talked of, she must make enquiries, she must regret the imprudence, lament the result, and Captain Wentworth's name must be mentioned by both.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
14  He had, in fact, though his sisters were now doing all they could for him, by calling him "poor Richard," been nothing better than a thick-headed, unfeeling, unprofitable Dick Musgrove, who had never done anything to entitle himself to more than the abbreviation of his name, living or dead.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
15  Captain Benwick listened attentively, and seemed grateful for the interest implied; and though with a shake of the head, and sighs which declared his little faith in the efficacy of any books on grief like his, noted down the names of those she recommended, and promised to procure and read them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
16  The girls were now hunting for the Laconia; and Captain Wentworth could not deny himself the pleasure of taking the precious volume into his own hands to save them the trouble, and once more read aloud the little statement of her name and rate, and present non-commissioned class, observing over it that she too had been one of the best friends man ever had.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
17  A name that I am so very well acquainted with; knew the gentleman so well by sight; seen him a hundred times; came to consult me once, I remember, about a trespass of one of his neighbours; farmer's man breaking into his orchard; wall torn down; apples stolen; caught in the fact; and afterwards, contrary to my judgement, submitted to an amicable compromise.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
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