POLITICS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - politics in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Madame complied with a polite air.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
2  I do it because it's politic; I do it on principle.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XI. A Companion Picture
3  He was smoother and more polite to me than the elder; but I saw this.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
4  I would not say happily, my friend," returned the uncle, with refined politeness; "I would not be sure of that.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
5  She only knew that there had been an attack upon the prisons, that all political prisoners had been in danger, and that some had been dragged out by the crowd and murdered.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
6  So polite and so impressible was Monseigneur, that the Comedy and the Grand Opera had far more influence with him in the tiresome articles of state affairs and state secrets, than the needs of all France.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
7  "I know this messenger, guard," said Mr. Lorry, getting down into the road--assisted from behind more swiftly than politely by the other two passengers, who immediately scrambled into the coach, shut the door, and pulled up the window.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
8  Such homes had these various notabilities left behind them in the fine world of Paris, that the spies among the assembled devotees of Monseigneur--forming a goodly half of the polite company--would have found it hard to discover among the angels of that sphere one solitary wife, who, in her manners and appearance, owned to being a Mother.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town