PRIDE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - pride in Persuasion
1  She has a great deal too much of the Elliot pride.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
2  He thought it a very degrading alliance; and Lady Russell, though with more tempered and pardonable pride, received it as a most unfortunate one.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
3  Mary is good-natured enough in many respects," said she; "but she does sometimes provoke me excessively, by her nonsense and pride--the Elliot pride.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
4  The Miss Musgroves were not at all tired, and Mary was either offended, by not being asked before any of the others, or what Louisa called the Elliot pride could not endure to make a third in a one horse chaise.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
5  You talk of being proud; I am called proud, I know, and I shall not wish to believe myself otherwise; for our pride, if investigated, would have the same object, I have no doubt, though the kind may seem a little different.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
6  There he had seen everything to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost; and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her when thrown in his way.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
7  The two families had always been on excellent terms, there being no pride on one side, and no envy on the other, and only such a consciousness of superiority in the Miss Musgroves, as made them pleased to improve their cousins.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
8  He had remained in Shropshire, lamenting the blindness of his own pride, and the blunders of his own calculations, till at once released from Louisa by the astonishing and felicitous intelligence of her engagement with Benwick.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
9  He had strong feelings of family attachment and family honour, without pride or weakness; he lived with the liberality of a man of fortune, without display; he judged for himself in everything essential, without defying public opinion in any point of worldly decorum.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
10  The sister, Mrs Croft, had then been out of England, accompanying her husband on a foreign station, and her own sister, Mary, had been at school while it all occurred; and never admitted by the pride of some, and the delicacy of others, to the smallest knowledge of it afterwards.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
11  She had hoped better things from their high ideas of their own situation in life, and was reduced to form a wish which she had never foreseen; a wish that they had more pride; for "our cousins Lady Dalrymple and Miss Carteret;" "our cousins, the Dalrymples," sounded in her ears all day long.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
12  This very awkward history of Mr Elliot was still, after an interval of several years, felt with anger by Elizabeth, who had liked the man for himself, and still more for being her father's heir, and whose strong family pride could see only in him a proper match for Sir Walter Elliot's eldest daughter.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
13  Their two confidential friends, Mr Shepherd, who lived in the neighbouring market town, and Lady Russell, were called to advise them; and both father and daughter seemed to expect that something should be struck out by one or the other to remove their embarrassments and reduce their expenditure, without involving the loss of any indulgence of taste or pride.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1