SHOEMAKER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - shoemaker in A Tale of Two Cities
1  The shoemaker looked up as before, but without removing a hand from his work.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
2  When he had stood, for a minute or two, by the side of Defarge, the shoemaker looked up.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
3  He slept heavily, and his tray of shoemaking tools, and his old unfinished work, were all as usual.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
4  In the midst of the action he went astray, and, with another deep sigh, fell to work at his shoemaking.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
5  I want," said Defarge, who had not removed his gaze from the shoemaker, "to let in a little more light here.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
6  It happened, at length, that he had occasion to change the instrument in his hand, for his shoemaker's knife.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
7  The bench was turned towards the light, as it had been when he had seen the shoemaker at his work before, and his head was bent down, and he was very busy.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
8  It would have been difficult by a far brighter light, to recognise in Doctor Manette, intellectual of face and upright of bearing, the shoemaker of the garret in Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
9  For, going to the door of the Doctor's room and looking in, he perceived that the shoemaker's bench and tools were put aside again, and that the Doctor himself sat reading at the window.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIX. An Opinion
10  The shoemaker stopped his work; looked with a vacant air of listening, at the floor on one side of him; then similarly, at the floor on the other side of him; then, upward at the speaker.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
11  It died out, as everything but his shoemaking did die out of him, and he refolded his little packet and tried to secure it in his breast; but he still looked at her, and gloomily shook his head.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
12  The prisoner had got into a coach, and his daughter had followed him, when Mr. Lorry's feet were arrested on the step by his asking, miserably, for his shoemaking tools and the unfinished shoes.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
13  There, with closed doors, and in a mysterious and guilty manner, Mr. Lorry hacked the shoemaker's bench to pieces, while Miss Pross held the candle as if she were assisting at a murder--for which, indeed, in her grimness, she was no unsuitable figure.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIX. An Opinion
14  They returned home to breakfast, and all went well, and in due course the golden hair that had mingled with the poor shoemaker's white locks in the Paris garret, were mingled with them again in the morning sunlight, on the threshold of the door at parting.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
15  The secret was well kept, and Lucie was unconscious and happy; but he could not fail to observe that the shoemaker, whose hand had been a little out at first, was growing dreadfully skilful, and that he had never been so intent on his work, and that his hands had never been so nimble and expert, as in the dusk of the ninth evening.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days