SKY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - sky in A Tale of Two Cities
1  A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V. The Wood-Sawyer
2  Though the earth was cold and wet, the sky was clear, and the sun rose bright, placid, and beautiful.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
3  When he got out of the house, the air was cold and sad, the dull sky overcast, the river dark and dim, the whole scene like a lifeless desert.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
4  The mender of roads, and two hundred and fifty particular friends, stood with folded arms at the fountain, looking at the pillar of fire in the sky.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
5  There was a small, heavily-grated, unglazed window high in the wall, with a stone screen before it, so that the sky could be only seen by stooping low and looking up.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
6  He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
7  A curious contagion of whispering was upon it, and also, when it gathered together at the fountain in the dark, another curious contagion of looking expectantly at the sky in one direction only.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
8  He and the mender of roads sat on the heap of stones looking silently at one another, with the hail driving in between them like a pigmy charge of bayonets, until the sky began to clear over the village.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
9  By degrees, as they could bear no more, they dropped off one by one, and lights twinkled in little casements; which lights, as the casements darkened, and more stars came out, seemed to have shot up into the sky instead of having been extinguished.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
10  Unbelieving Philosophers who were remodelling the world with words, and making card-towers of Babel to scale the skies with, talked with Unbelieving Chemists who had an eye on the transmutation of metals, at this wonderful gathering accumulated by Monseigneur.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
11  Chateau and hut, stone face and dangling figure, the red stain on the stone floor, and the pure water in the village well--thousands of acres of land--a whole province of France--all France itself--lay under the night sky, concentrated into a faint hair-breadth line.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
12  The man slept on, indifferent to showers of hail and intervals of brightness, to sunshine on his face and shadow, to the paltering lumps of dull ice on his body and the diamonds into which the sun changed them, until the sun was low in the west, and the sky was glowing.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
13  The night wore out, and, as he stood upon the bridge listening to the water as it splashed the river-walls of the Island of Paris, where the picturesque confusion of houses and cathedral shone bright in the light of the moon, the day came coldly, looking like a dead face out of the sky.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX. The Game Made