SUFFER in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - suffer in A Tale of Two Cities
1  On the road I have suffered a great deal.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
2  I am supported from above: don't suffer for me.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XI. Dusk
3  For the first time the Doctor felt, now, that his suffering was strength and power.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
4  You oppose yourself to the profit of the business," said Jerry, "and me and my partners suffer.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
5  It was the first time, except at the trial, of her ever hearing him refer to the period of his suffering.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVII. One Night
6  Her hope had been to avert the wrath of Heaven from a House that had long been hateful to the suffering many.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
7  He was happy in the return he had made her, he was recompensed for his suffering, he was proud of his strength.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI. Triumph
8  A pause of forgetfulness, and then he had even suffered, and had come back to her, dead and at peace, and yet there was no difference in him.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
9  It is the case of a shock from which the sufferer recovered, by a process that he cannot trace himself--as I once heard him publicly relate in a striking manner.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIX. An Opinion
10  The remorseless sea of turbulently swaying shapes, voices of vengeance, and faces hardened in the furnaces of suffering until the touch of pity could make no mark on them.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
11  One of the most remarkable sufferers by the same axe--a woman--had asked at the foot of the same scaffold, not long before, to be allowed to write down the thoughts that were inspiring her.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever
12  It is the case of a shock under which the sufferer was borne down, one cannot say for how long, because I believe he cannot calculate the time himself, and there are no other means of getting at it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIX. An Opinion
13  He had sunk in her arms, and his face dropped on her breast: a sight so touching, yet so terrible in the tremendous wrong and suffering which had gone before it, that the two beholders covered their faces.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
14  Physical diseases, engendered in the vices and neglects of men, will seize on victims of all degrees; and the frightful moral disorder, born of unspeakable suffering, intolerable oppression, and heartless indifference, smote equally without distinction.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
15  Beneath that arch of unmoved and eternal lights; some, so remote from this little earth that the learned tell us it is doubtful whether their rays have even yet discovered it, as a point in space where anything is suffered or done: the shadows of the night were broad and black.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
16  It is likely enough that, rooted in the woods of France and Norway, there were growing trees, when that sufferer was put to death, already marked by the Woodman, Fate, to come down and be sawn into boards, to make a certain movable framework with a sack and a knife in it, terrible in history.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I. The Period
17  Monsieur the Marquis cast his eyes over the submissive faces that drooped before him, as the like of himself had drooped before Monseigneur of the Court--only the difference was, that these faces drooped merely to suffer and not to propitiate--when a grizzled mender of the roads joined the group.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.