TRUTH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - truth in A Tale of Two Cities
1  I believe your object to be, purely and truthfully, as you have stated it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
2  "A bad truth for you," said Defarge, speaking with knitted brows, and looking straight before him.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I. In Secret
3  He had come back, to save a citizen's life, and to bear his testimony, at whatever personal hazard, to the truth.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI. Triumph
4  "The truth is, my dear Charles," Mr. Lorry glanced at the distant House, and lowered his voice, "you can have no conception of the difficulty with which our business is transacted, and of the peril in which our books and papers over yonder are involved."
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
5  He looked at them, and saw in them, without knowing it, the slow sure filing down of misery-worn face and figure, that was to make the meagreness of Frenchmen an English superstition which should survive the truth through the best part of a hundred years.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
6  Such vapouring, combined with the extravagant plots of Monseigneur for the restoration of a state of things that had utterly exhausted itself, and worn out Heaven and earth as well as itself, was hard to be endured without some remonstrance by any sane man who knew the truth.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
7  He besought her--though he added that he knew it was needless--to console her father, by impressing him through every tender means she could think of, with the truth that he had done nothing for which he could justly reproach himself, but had uniformly forgotten himself for their joint sakes.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
8  The garret, built to be a depository for firewood and the like, was dim and dark: for, the window of dormer shape, was in truth a door in the roof, with a little crane over it for the hoisting up of stores from the street: unglazed, and closing up the middle in two pieces, like any other door of French construction.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
9  I know from terrible warnings I have noted in myself that my reason will not long remain unimpaired, but I solemnly declare that I am at this time in the possession of my right mind--that my memory is exact and circumstantial--and that I write the truth as I shall answer for these my last recorded words, whether they be ever read by men or not, at the Eternal Judgment-seat.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow