WATER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - water in A Tale of Two Cities
1  If I, as a honest tradesman, am able to provide a little beer, none of your declaring on water.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
2  In the glow, the water of the chateau fountain seemed to turn to blood, and the stone faces crimsoned.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
3  As the boat so favoured is usually in a rough plight, and mostly under water, so, Sydney had a swamped life of it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
4  Then, the grey water of both began to be ghostly in the light, and the eyes of the stone faces of the chateau were opened.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX. The Gorgon's Head
5  The crippling stones of the pavement, with their many little reservoirs of mud and water, had no footways, but broke off abruptly at the doors.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
6  The altitude of the gallows that would turn to water and quench it, no functionary, by any stretch of mathematics, was able to calculate successfully.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
7  It was appointed that the water should be locked in an eternal frost, when the light was playing on its surface, and I stood in ignorance on the shore.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
8  Sullenly enough, the jackal loosened his dress, went into an adjoining room, and came back with a large jug of cold water, a basin, and a towel or two.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
9  No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
10  Mr. Stryver shouldered his way through the law, like some great engine forcing itself through turbid water, and dragged his useful friend in his wake, like a boat towed astern.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
11  A memorable storm of thunder and lightning broke with that sweep of water, and there was not a moment's interval in crash, and fire, and rain, until after the moon rose at midnight.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
12  The spy, well used to his business, did not change his unconscious attitude, but drained his little glass of cognac, took a sip of fresh water, and asked for another glass of cognac.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
13  Molten lead and iron boiled in the marble basin of the fountain; the water ran dry; the extinguisher tops of the towers vanished like ice before the heat, and trickled down into four rugged wells of flame.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
14  Chateau and hut, stone face and dangling figure, the red stain on the stone floor, and the pure water in the village well--thousands of acres of land--a whole province of France--all France itself--lay under the night sky, concentrated into a faint hair-breadth line.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
15  The water of the fountain ran, the swift river ran, the day ran into evening, so much life in the city ran into death according to rule, time and tide waited for no man, the rats were sleeping close together in their dark holes again, the Fancy Ball was lighted up at supper, all things ran their course.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
16  The father had long ago taken up his bundle and bidden himself away with it, when the women who had tended the bundle while it lay on the base of the fountain, sat there watching the running of the water and the rolling of the Fancy Ball--when the one woman who had stood conspicuous, knitting, still knitted on with the steadfastness of Fate.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
17  But, he had not yet spoken to her on the subject; the assassination at the deserted chateau far away beyond the heaving water and the long, long, dusty roads--the solid stone chateau which had itself become the mere mist of a dream--had been done a year, and he had never yet, by so much as a single spoken word, disclosed to her the state of his heart.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
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