WEAKNESS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - weakness in A Tale of Two Cities
1  It was obviously the weakness of the position.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX. The Game Made
2  You must not be weak, my darling," he remonstrated; "don't tremble so.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI. Triumph
3  I was weak and faint when you brought me in, and I am fainter now you take me out.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
4  This was a courage that Madame Defarge so little comprehended as to mistake for weakness.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
5  It was not the faintness of physical weakness, though confinement and hard fare no doubt had their part in it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
6  Her father, cheering her, showed a compassionate superiority to this woman's weakness, which was wonderful to see.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII. A Knock at the Door
7  They were discussing this question, and were almost building up some weak structure of hope on his prolonged absence, when they heard him on the stairs.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
8  Argued with the jury on substantial worldly grounds--the only grounds ever worth taking into account--it was a plain case, and had not a weak spot in it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy
9  So entirely had it lost the life and resonance of the human voice, that it affected the senses like a once beautiful colour faded away into a poor weak stain.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
10  When the prisoner came on board, he noticed that my father," turning her eyes lovingly to him as he stood beside her, "was much fatigued and in a very weak state of health.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
11  Defarge, a weak minority, interposed a few words for the memory of the compassionate wife of the Marquis; but only elicited from his own wife a repetition of her last reply.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
12  The Doctor knew, that up to that time, his imprisonment had been associated in the minds of his daughter and his friend, with his personal affliction, deprivation, and weakness.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
13  The task of recalling him from the vagrancy into which he always sank when he had spoken, was like recalling some very weak person from a swoon, or endeavouring, in the hope of some disclosure, to stay the spirit of a fast-dying man.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
14  Now that this was changed, and he knew himself to be invested through that old trial with forces to which they both looked for Charles's ultimate safety and deliverance, he became so far exalted by the change, that he took the lead and direction, and required them as the weak, to trust to him as the strong.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm
15  So, he pushed open the door with the weak rattle in its throat, stumbled down the two steps, got past the two ancient cashiers, and shouldered himself into the musty back closet where Mr. Lorry sat at great books ruled for figures, with perpendicular iron bars to his window as if that were ruled for figures too, and everything under the clouds were a sum.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII. The Fellow of Delicacy
16  How it would be a weakness in the government to break down in this attempt to practise for popularity on the lowest national antipathies and fears, and therefore Mr. Attorney-General had made the most of it; how, nevertheless, it rested upon nothing, save that vile and infamous character of evidence too often disfiguring such cases, and of which the State Trials of this country were full.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment