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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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1  To pacify Mary, and perhaps screen her own embarrassment, Anne did move quietly to the window.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
2  He continued at the window; and after calmly and politely saying, "I hope the little boy is better," was silent.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  Anne," cried Mary, still at her window, "there is Mrs Clay, I am sure, standing under the colonnade, and a gentleman with her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
4  The window at which he stood was at the other end of the room from where the two ladies were sitting, and though nearer to Captain Wentworth's table, not very near.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
5  I have not seen one of them to-day, except Mr Musgrove, who just stopped and spoke through the window, but without getting off his horse; and though I told him how ill I was, not one of them have been near me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
6  One morning, about this time Charles Musgrove and Captain Wentworth being gone a-shooting together, as the sisters in the Cottage were sitting quietly at work, they were visited at the window by the sisters from the Mansion-house.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
7  It was fixed accordingly, that Mrs Clay should be of the party in the carriage; and they had just reached this point, when Anne, as she sat near the window, descried, most decidedly and distinctly, Captain Wentworth walking down the street.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
8  He was standing by himself at a printshop window, with his hands behind him, in earnest contemplation of some print, and she not only might have passed him unseen, but was obliged to touch as well as address him before she could catch his notice.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  Captain Wentworth, however, came from his window, apparently not ill-disposed for conversation; but Charles Hayter soon put an end to his attempts by seating himself near the table, and taking up the newspaper; and Captain Wentworth returned to his window.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
10  Captain Harville, who had in truth been hearing none of it, now left his seat, and moved to a window, and Anne seeming to watch him, though it was from thorough absence of mind, became gradually sensible that he was inviting her to join him where he stood.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
11  Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone, the Miss Musgroves were gone too, suddenly resolving to walk to the end of the village with the sportsmen: the room was cleared, and Anne might finish her breakfast as she could.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
12  Louisa could not listen at all to his account of a conversation which he had just held with Dr Shirley: she was at a window, looking out for Captain Wentworth; and even Henrietta had at best only a divided attention to give, and seemed to have forgotten all the former doubt and solicitude of the negotiation.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
13  The surprise of finding himself almost alone with Anne Elliot, deprived his manners of their usual composure: he started, and could only say, "I thought the Miss Musgroves had been here: Mrs Musgrove told me I should find them here," before he walked to the window to recollect himself, and feel how he ought to behave.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
14  Anne had a moment's astonishment on the subject herself; but it was soon lost in the pleasanter feelings which sprang from the sight of all the ingenious contrivances and nice arrangements of Captain Harville, to turn the actual space to the best account, to supply the deficiencies of lodging-house furniture, and defend the windows and doors against the winter storms to be expected.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11