8th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 8: With Definition - 5
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 Grade 8: With Definition - 5
indictmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a thing that serves to illustrate that a system or situation is bad
n. a formal statement of accusing someone
inductionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a formal entry into an organization, position, or office
n. act of causing an event or process to happen
initiatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. begin or originate; cause something to begin
Everyone was very polite and kind to her because he felt sorry for her, but no one could forget that she had compounded her initial error of birth by being the governess of Mr.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
Sowerberry rightly construed this, as an acquiescence in his proposition; it was speedily determined, therefore, that Oliver should be at once initiated into the mysteries of the trade; and, with this view, that he should accompany his master on the very next occasion of his services being required.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
Biddy looked thoughtfully at it, heard my explanation, looked thoughtfully at my sister, looked thoughtfully at Joe (who was always represented on the slate by his initial letter), and ran into the forge, followed by Joe and me.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
initiationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an occasion when something starts
Everyone was very polite and kind to her because he felt sorry for her, but no one could forget that she had compounded her initial error of birth by being the governess of Mr.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
Sowerberry rightly construed this, as an acquiescence in his proposition; it was speedily determined, therefore, that Oliver should be at once initiated into the mysteries of the trade; and, with this view, that he should accompany his master on the very next occasion of his services being required.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
Biddy looked thoughtfully at it, heard my explanation, looked thoughtfully at my sister, looked thoughtfully at Joe (who was always represented on the slate by his initial letter), and ran into the forge, followed by Joe and me.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
inspectorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. someone whose job is to officially inspect something
n. high ranking police officer
The conduct of the criminal investigation has been left in the experienced hands of Inspector Lestrade, of Scotland Yard, who is following up the clues with his accustomed energy and sagacity.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Inspector Gregory was full of his case, and poured out a stream of remarks, while Holmes threw in an occasional question or interjection.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
On the inspector of constabulary informing him that he was a prisoner, he remarked that he was not surprised to hear it, and that it was no more than his deserts.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
interiorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. inside part of something; inner part
He was leaning against the ledge of an open lattice, but not looking out: his face was turned to the interior gloom.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 34
By Emily Bronte Context
He could now see the interior of the pit, which, being in the side of the hill, had a level entrance.
Return of the Native - Chapter 8
By Thomas Hardy Context
The interior section was what counted, if the South was going to win the war, and Atlanta was now the center of things.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
interjectionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an abrupt remark, made especially as an interruption
n. an occasion when someone interrupts someone else
Markleham during the whole narration, and the shrill, sharp interjections with which she occasionally interrupted it, defy description.
David Copperfield - Chapter 45
By Charles Dickens Context
Inspector Gregory was full of his case, and poured out a stream of remarks, while Holmes threw in an occasional question or interjection.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
intermissionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a short period between the parts of a play or concert; interval during which there is a temporary cessation
She wondered, with little intermission what could be the reason of it; was sure there must be some bad news, and thought over every kind of distress that could have befallen him, with a fixed determination that he should not escape them all.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 14
By Jane Austen Context
intermittentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. periodic; on and off; stopping and starting at intervals
Shocked at first by his rudeness, the ladies finally became accustomed to him and, as he was so silent, except for intermittent explosions of tobacco juice, they took him as much for granted as the horses he drove and forgot his very existence.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
His pulse was feeble and intermittent, but his breathing grew longer, and there was a little shivering of his eyelids, which showed a thin white slit of ball beneath.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
interrogationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a process of asking someone questions for a long time to get information
n. formal systematic questioning
He stood with his head on one side and himself on one side, in a bullying, interrogative manner, and he threw his forefinger at Mr.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
interruptionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation
n. abrupt occasion that stops an ongoing activity
Could Elinor have listened to her without interruption from the others, she would have described every room in the house with equal delight.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 13
By Jane Austen Context
There, shut into her own room, as soon as their visitor left them, she could think without interruption of all that she had heard.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 33
By Jane Austen Context
The interruption had been short, though severe, and ease and animation returned to most of those they left as the door shut them out, but not to Anne.
Persuasion - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
invitationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a request to participate, be present, or take part in something
n. action that causes or encourages something to happen
This was an invitation for Oliver to enter through a door which he unlocked as he spoke, and which led into a stone cell.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
For I am sensible that it may not have been a part of my system to invite any confidence of that kind.
Hard Times - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
My guardian was in his room, washing his hands with his scented soap, when I went into the office from Walworth; and he called me to him, and gave me the invitation for myself and friends which Wemmick had prepared me to receive.
Great Expectations - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
jaguarspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a large wild animal of the cat family that lives in Central and South America
judgmentalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having or displaying an excessively critical point of view
I seated myself in a chair, and rocked to and fro, passing harsh judgment on my many derelictions of duty; from which, it struck me then, all the misfortunes of my employers sprang.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 27
By Emily Bronte Context
Elinor, this eldest daughter, whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding, and coolness of judgment, which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
His diffidence had prevented his depending on his own judgment in so anxious a case, but his reliance on mine made every thing easy.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 58
By Jane Austen Context
justicespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. quality of being just; fairness in the way people are dealt with; uprightness
Meanwhile, since it is too late to prevent this tragedy, I am very anxious that I should use the knowledge which I possess in order to insure that justice be done.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If she had been willing to help justice she would probably have communicated with the police already.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
But the inspector was mistaken, for those criminals were not destined to fall into the hands of justice.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
juvenilespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. youth or adolescent; not fully grown or developed
In sticking up the candle he lifted the lantern to his face, and the light shone into the whites of his eyes and upon his ivory teeth, which, in contrast with the red surrounding, lent him a startling aspect enough to the gaze of a juvenile.
Return of the Native - Chapter 8
By Thomas Hardy Context
I know that my juvenile experiences went for little or nothing then; and that life was more like a great fairy story, which I was just about to begin to read, than anything else.
David Copperfield - Chapter 19
By Charles Dickens Context
Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
laboratoryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a workplace for the conduct of scientific research
The bottle was downstairs in my laboratory, so leaving my patient seated in his chair, I ran down to get it.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Among the many billets which I have filled in America during my wandering life, I was once janitor and sweeper out of the laboratory at York College.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
lagoonspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a body of water cut off from a larger body by a reef of sand or coral
It was a lovely summer afternoon, the shallow lagoon rippled, the full sunshine made Venice, turning its back to them across the water, look dim.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
lanternspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. light in a transparent protective case
Toby complied, by first producing his lantern, and placing it on the ground; then by planting himself firmly with his head against the wall beneath the window, and his hands upon his knees, so as to make a step of his back.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
By this time a whole village was up: and windlasses, ropes, poles, candles, lanterns, all things necessary, were fast collecting and being brought into one place, to be carried to the Old Hell Shaft.
Hard Times - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
Not stumbling on the means after all, I was fain to go out to the adjacent Lodge and get the watchman there to come with his lantern.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
legalizespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make legal; allow something by law
Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
They then proceeded to take legal steps against my liege lady, who for her part disappeared, having always had a mortal fear of the police.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
And should this happen, she had no legal rights, no legal redress, except those same drumhead courts of which Tony had spoken so bitterly, those military courts with their arbitrary powers.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 37
By Margaret Mitche Context
lieutenantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an officer of middle rank in the armed forces
n. an assistant with power to act when his superior is absent
But Miss Frances married, in the common phrase, to disoblige her family, and by fixing on a lieutenant of marines, without education, fortune, or connexions, did it very thoroughly.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
Now he had become a first lieutenant in a smart regiment, so he could mock at everything more becomingly in uniform.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
Raiford Calvert was made first lieutenant, because everybody liked Raif, and Able Wynder, son of a swamp trapper, himself a small farmer, was elected second lieutenant.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
literalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. according to the letter or verbal expression; exactly as stated
Gray wool for uniforms was now almost literally more priceless than rubies, and Ashley was wearing the familiar homespun.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 15
By Margaret Mitche Context
Bounderby, bending himself at the knees, literally embraced his legs in his great satisfaction and laughed aloud.
Hard Times - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
It was a crazy old house with a wharf of its own, abutting on the water when the tide was in, and on the mud when the tide was out, and literally overrun with rats.
David Copperfield - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
locomotionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. self-propelled movement; power or ability to move
A lady so decorous in herself, and so highly connected, was not to be suspected of dropping over the banisters or sliding down them, yet her extraordinary facility of locomotion suggested the wild idea.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
logicalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. reasonable; based on known statements or events or conditions
There was in his face that hopelessness of being understood which comes when the objector is constitutionally beyond the reach of a logic that, even under favouring conditions, is almost too coarse a vehicle for the subtlety of the argument.
Return of the Native - Chapter 21
By Thomas Hardy Context
Some, too, have baffled his analytical skill, and would be, as narratives, beginnings without an ending, while others have been but partially cleared up, and have their explanations founded rather upon conjecture and surmise than on that absolute logical proof which was so dear to him.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I had the good fortune to seize upon that, and everything which has occurred since then has served to confirm my original supposition, and, indeed, was the logical sequence of it.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
luxuriousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. rich and superior in quality; lavish
I let him enjoy the luxury unannoyed; and after sucking out his last wreath, and heaving a profound sigh, he got up, and departed as solemnly as he came.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
He had supplied doctors and nurses and luxuries, but he had shrunk from the mere thought of the boy and had buried himself in his own misery.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 27
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Across the upper part of her head she wore a thin fillet of black velvet, restraining the luxuriance of her shady hair, in a way which added much to this class of majesty by irregularly clouding her forehead.
Return of the Native - Chapter 7
By Thomas Hardy Context
maintainspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. keep in any particular state or condition; keep up or carry on
Grimwig plants, fishes, and carpenters, with great ardour; doing everything in a very singular and unprecedented manner, but always maintaining with his favourite asseveration, that his mode is the right one.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 53
By Charles Dickens Context
That bereaved lady, fifteen years older than he, fell presently at deadly feud with her only relative, Lady Scadgers; and, partly to spite her ladyship, and partly to maintain herself, went out at a salary.
Hard Times - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
Many a year went round before I was a partner in the House; but I lived happily with Herbert and his wife, and lived frugally, and paid my debts, and maintained a constant correspondence with Biddy and Joe.
Great Expectations - Chapter 58
By Charles Dickens Context
maneuverspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a movement or set of movements needing skill and care; strategy
You could promise, with your eyes, any number of exciting things that would make a man maneuver to get you alone.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
mathematicsspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. science dealing with the logic of quantity and shape
It was like a mathematical formula and no more difficult, for mathematics was the one subject that had come easy to Scarlett in her schooldays.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
Her capacity of definition might be easily stated at a very low figure, her mathematical knowledge at nothing; yet he was not sure that if he had been required, for example, to tick her off into columns in a parliamentary return, he would have quite known how to divide her.
Hard Times - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context
He is a man of good birth and excellent education, endowed by nature with a phenomenal mathematical faculty.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
mayonnaisespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a thick, white sauce made from oil, vinegar, and the yellow part of eggs, usually eaten cold
mediaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. public institutions that report the news, such as newspapers, radio, and tv
medicinespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. treatment for illness or injury
n. a substance, like a liquid or a pill, that is a treatment for illness or injury
Bumble tasted the medicine with a doubtful look; smacked his lips; took another taste; and put the cup down empty.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 27
By Charles Dickens Context
In the midst of this, Rachael returned; and with her party there was a surgeon, who brought some wine and medicines.
Hard Times - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
The administration of mutton instead of medicine, the substitution of Tea for Joe, and the baker for bacon, were among the mildest of my own mistakes.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
memorizespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. learn something to remember it exactly; commit to memory; learn by heart
My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
Great Expectations - Chapter 1
By Charles Dickens Context
I cannot bear to think of what did come, upon that memorable night; of what must come again, if I go on.
David Copperfield - Chapter 31
By Charles Dickens Context
Tom bent all his energies to the memorizing of five verses, and he chose part of the Sermon on the Mount, because he could find no verses that were shorter.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
memoryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. faculty of mind by which it retains the knowledge of previous thoughts, impressions, or events
Her mind was inevitably at liberty; her thoughts could not be chained elsewhere; and the past and the future, on a subject so interesting, must be before her, must force her attention, and engross her memory, her reflection, and her fancy.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
His behaviour to myself has been scandalous; but I verily believe I could forgive him anything and everything, rather than his disappointing the hopes and disgracing the memory of his father.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
No one had ever come within the Kellynch circle, who could bear a comparison with Frederick Wentworth, as he stood in her memory.
Persuasion - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
merchandisespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. goods that are bought and sold
She had a large acquaintance, of course professionally, among those who can afford to buy, and she disposes of my merchandise.
Persuasion - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
meringuespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. sweet topping, especially for pies made of beaten egg whites and sugar
But she only put out her tongue at him and ordered another pastry, thick with chocolate and stuffed with meringue.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 48
By Margaret Mitche Context
meteorologyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. earth science dealing with phenomena of the atmosphere; predicting what the weather will be
meticulousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. excessively careful; marked by extreme care in treatment of details
metropolitanspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. city center; one who lives in a city center
The offence had been committed within the district, and indeed in the immediate neighborhood of, a very notorious metropolitan police office.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
Indeed, from the direction of the Metropolitan Station no one was coming save the single gentleman whose eccentric conduct had drawn my attention.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Michiganspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a state in the northern US; the 3rd largest of the Great Lakes
microbespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. minute life form; microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease
microbiologyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
microchipspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a very small piece of semiconductor, especially in a computer
microcosmspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. small, representative system having analogies to larger system; miniature model of something
microfilmspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. film containing photographs of documents at a greatly reduced size
microscopespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a device that uses lenses to make very small objects look larger
She could never have believed in the morning that her colourless inner world would before night become as animated as water under a microscope, and that without the arrival of a single visitor.
Return of the Native - Chapter 12
By Thomas Hardy Context
microwavespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an electric oven that uses waves of energy to cook or heat food quickly
n. a very short electromagnetic wave
minutiaespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the small, precise, or trivial details of something
misdemeanorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. minor crime; evil conduct; misdeed
missilespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. weapon that is thrown or projected; rocket carrying instruments or warhead
It struck beneath my ear, and stopped the sentence I was uttering; but, pulling it out, I sprang to the door and delivered another; which I hope went a little deeper than his missile.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
He had been wounded with some missiles from the crowd on the day of his capture, and his head was bandaged with a linen cloth.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 52
By Charles Dickens Context
There was a whiz as of a missile in the air, mingled with the murmur of a curse, a sound as of shivering glass followed, and a small, vague form went over the fence and shot away in the gloom.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 3
By Mark Twain Context
missionaryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a person who has been sent to a foreign country to teach religion