8th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 8: With Definition - 3
Get Vocabulary/Definition by list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
 Actions upon current list
 All lists of current grdae
 Grade 8: With Definition - 3
consumablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. intended to be used up and then replaced; possible to eat, drink, or use up completely
What her last illness was, I am not certain: I conjecture, they died of the same thing, a kind of fever, slow at its commencement, but incurable, and rapidly consuming life towards the close.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 18
By Emily Bronte Context
The absolute solitude in which they lived intensified their reciprocal thoughts; yet some might have said that it had the disadvantage of consuming their mutual affections at a fearfully prodigal rate.
Return of the Native - Chapter 28
By Thomas Hardy Context
A few minutes, though as few as possible, were inevitably consumed; and when her own mistress again, when able to turn and look as she had done before, she found herself accosted by Captain Wentworth, in a reserved yet hurried sort of farewell.
Persuasion - Chapter 20
By Jane Austen Context
contaminatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make impure or unclean by contact or mixture; pollute
Your presence is a moral poison that would contaminate the most virtuous: for that cause, and to prevent worse consequences, I shall deny you hereafter admission into this house, and give notice now that I require your instant departure.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 11
By Emily Bronte Context
So contaminated did I feel, remembering who was coming, that the coach came quickly after all, and I was not yet free from the soiling consciousness of Mr.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
continentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one of the seven large land masses on the earth's surface
Vapours from other continents arrived upon the wind, which curled and parted round him as he walked on.
Return of the Native - Chapter 25
By Thomas Hardy Context
She had left not only that graceful dwelling but also the entire civilization that was behind the building of it, and she found herself in a world that was as strange and different as if she had crossed a continent.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
IN the central portion of the great North American Continent there lies an arid and repulsive desert, which for many a long year served as a barrier against the advance of civilisation.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
contradictspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. deny the truth of a statement, especially by asserting the opposite; confront
Then the doctor had said that she would not bear crossing much; she ought to have her own way; and it was nothing less than murder in her eyes for any one to presume to stand up and contradict her.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
Of course I contradict the tale everywhere; but it is very vexing, and I wonder how it could have originated.
Return of the Native - Chapter 19
By Thomas Hardy Context
What Lucy had asserted to be true, therefore, Elinor could not, dared not longer doubt; supported as it was too on every side by such probabilities and proofs, and contradicted by nothing but her own wishes.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
correlationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. mutual relationship; a connection between two or more facts
corruptionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. illegal, bad, or dishonest behaviour, especially by people in positions of power; bribery or fraud
She would not betray her trust, I suppose, without bribery and corruption, for she really did know where her friend was to be found.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 52
By Jane Austen Context
They have all, perhaps, been corrupting one another; but if they are so much fonder of her than she is of them, she is the less likely to have been hurt, except by their flattery.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 44
By Jane Austen Context
Never before or after did the names Republican and Scallawag carry such odium, for now the corruption of the Carpet bag regime was at its height.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 52
By Margaret Mitche Context
cowardicespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. lack of courage to face danger; extreme timidity; lack of spirit
Inquiries were made as to how it got there; I was obliged to confess, and in recompense for my cowardice and inhumanity was sent out of the house.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 4
By Emily Bronte Context
War romances, war weddings, deaths in hospitals and on the field, incidents of camp and battle and march, gallantry, cowardice, humor, sadness, deprivation and hope.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 17
By Margaret Mitche Context
If it were a girl, it was to inherit the money unconditionally; but if a boy, only on the stipulation that in his minority he should never have stained his name with any public act of dishonour, meanness, cowardice, or wrong.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
criminalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one who has committed a crime; one who is found guilty by verdict
It was rumored to be the refuge of negro and white criminals and was the first place the Yankee soldiers searched when they wanted a man.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 44
By Margaret Mitche Context
There was nobody inside but a miserable shoeless criminal, who had been taken up for playing the flute, and who, the offence against society having been clearly proved, had been very properly committed by Mr.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
There was a bookcase in the room; I saw from the backs of the books, that they were about evidence, criminal law, criminal biography, trials, acts of Parliament, and such things.
Great Expectations - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
culturalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to the habits, traditions, and beliefs of a society
To argue upon the possibility of culture before luxury to the bucolic world may be to argue truly, but it is an attempt to disturb a sequence to which humanity has been long accustomed.
Return of the Native - Chapter 21
By Thomas Hardy Context
Between artists and cultured socialists, Constance and her sister Hilda had had what might be called an aesthetically unconventional upbringing.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
He was a man of little culture, but with a considerable amount of rude strength, both physically and mentally.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
curiousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. interested in learning about people or things around you; eager for knowledge
When the breakfast was cleared away; the merry old gentlman and the two boys played at a very curious and uncommon game, which was performed in this way.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 9
By Charles Dickens Context
Childers and Master Kidderminster walked in a curious manner; with their legs wider apart than the general run of men, and with a very knowing assumption of being stiff in the knees.
Hard Times - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
Again and again and again, my sister had traced upon the slate, a character that looked like a curious T, and then with the utmost eagerness had called our attention to it as something she particularly wanted.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
custodianspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a person who has responsibility for or looks after something
decisionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a choice that you make about something after thinking about several possibilities
It gave to his intentions whatever of decision was wanting before; and he finally resolved, that it would be absolutely unnecessary, if not highly indecorous, to do more for the widow and children of his father, than such kind of neighbourly acts as his own wife pointed out.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 2
By Jane Austen Context
That I was desirous of believing her indifferent is certain�but I will venture to say that my investigation and decisions are not usually influenced by my hopes or fears.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 35
By Jane Austen Context
She was a woman rather of sound than of quick abilities, whose difficulties in coming to any decision in this instance were great, from the opposition of two leading principles.
Persuasion - Chapter 2
By Jane Austen Context
decreasespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. lessen or reduce; make a quantity smaller
All the shallower ponds had decreased to a vaporous mud amid which the maggoty shapes of innumerable obscure creatures could be indistinctly seen, heaving and wallowing with enjoyment.
Return of the Native - Chapter 32
By Thomas Hardy Context
deductivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. reaching an answer by thinking carefully about the known facts
a. involving inferences from general principles
At this point I agreed with you that it was preposterous and was glad to find that all my deductions had been correct.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
You see, Watson, our little deductions have suddenly assumed a much more important and less innocent aspect.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Like all other arts, the Science of Deduction and Analysis is one which can only be acquired by long and patient study nor is life long enough to allow any mortal to attain the highest possible perfection in it.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
defendantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a person in a court of law who is accused of having done something wrong
Happily, the architect had foresight to build it strong: the narrow windows are deeply set in the wall, and the corners defended with large jutting stones.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 1
By Emily Bronte Context
In that, he could not be defended; but if he had injured her, how much more had he injured himself; if her case were pitiable, his was hopeless.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
As they walked home, Elizabeth related to Jane what she had seen pass between the two gentlemen; but though Jane would have defended either or both, had they appeared to be in the wrong, she could no more explain such behaviour than her sister.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 15
By Jane Austen Context
definitelyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. without question and beyond doubt; clearly
Wickham�when she read with somewhat clearer attention a relation of events which, if true, must overthrow every cherished opinion of his worth, and which bore so alarming an affinity to his own history of himself�her feelings were yet more acutely painful and more difficult of definition.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 36
By Jane Austen Context
She did not know what she was looking for, or at, very definitely, yet she moved the lamp till it shone full on her.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 7
By D H Lawrence Context
The war had definitely established the importance of Atlanta in the affairs of the South and the hitherto obscure town was now known far and wide.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 37
By Margaret Mitche Context
dehydratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. remove water from; dry out; lose water or bodily fluids
Delawarespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a state in the northeastern US
deodorantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a substance that is used to prevent or hide unpleasant smells, like those of the body
departspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. go away or leave, especially on a journey; set out
When our illustrious visitors had departed Holmes lit his pipe in silence and sat for some time lost in the deepest thought.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Indeed, if I may make a full confession to you, I was quite convinced that the letter from Meiringen was a hoax, and I allowed you to depart on that errand under the persuasion that some development of this sort would follow.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I sent John, the coachman, to watch you, ran upstairs, got into my walking clothes, as I call them, and came down just as you departed.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
dependentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relying on or requiring the aid of another for support
If, as I imagine, there is no breach of the law in this matter, you can absolutely depend upon my discretion and my cooperation in keeping the facts out of the papers.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The same may be said, my dear fellow, for the effect of some of these little sketches of yours, which is entirely meretricious, depending as it does upon your retaining in your own hands some factors in the problem which are never imparted to the reader.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Then it flashed through my mind that the pain of my death would depend very much upon the position in which I met it.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
deprivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. take something away from someone
It was clear to me, from the strength of the glasses, that the wearer must have been very blind and helpless when deprived of them.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was equally certain that the same stranger had, while standing at the window, drugged his curried mutton, and so deprived the stables of their watchman.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My stepfather learned of the engagement when my sister returned and offered no objection to the marriage; but within a fortnight of the day which had been fixed for the wedding, the terrible event occurred which has deprived me of my only companion.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
descendantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a person related to someone from an earlier generation; offspring
He lighted his lantern from that which Monks had detached from the rope, and now carried in his hand; and making no effort to prolong the discourse, descended in silence, followed by his wife.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
Neither, as she approached her old home now, did any of the best influences of old home descend upon her.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
The turnkey laughed, and gave us good day, and stood laughing at us over the spikes of the wicket when we descended the steps into the street.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
despondentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unhappy and with no hope or enthusiasm
We knew she was really better, and, therefore, decided that long confinement to a single place produced much of this despondency, and it might be partially removed by a change of scene.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 13
By Emily Bronte Context
With this expression of feeling for his unfortunate friend, Master Bates sat himself on the nearest chair with an aspect of chagrin and despondency.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 43
By Charles Dickens Context
In a state of despondency, which I remember with anything but satisfaction, for I know it still had too much reference to myself (though always in connexion with Dora), I left the office, and went homeward.
David Copperfield - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
detectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. discover the presence of; identify
Holmes had recovered his equanimity, though I still seemed to detect gleams of amusement in his expression.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Were it mixed with any ordinary dish the eater would undoubtedly detect it, and would probably eat no more.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
There is no doubt that you have detected and defeated in the most complete manner one of the most determined attempts at bank robbery that have ever come within my experience.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
diameterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. length of a straight line passing through the center of a circle and connecting two points on its edge
Shadwater Weir had at its foot a large circular pool, fifty feet in diameter, into which the water flowed through ten huge hatches, raised and lowered by a winch and cogs in the ordinary manner.
Return of the Native - Chapter 44
By Thomas Hardy Context
dictationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. action of saying words aloud to be typed or written down
n. action of giving orders authoritatively
You must therefore allow me to follow the dictates of my conscience on this occasion, which leads me to perform what I look on as a point of duty.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
She acknowledged it to be very fitting, that every little social commonwealth should dictate its own matters of discourse; and hoped, ere long, to become a not unworthy member of the one she was now transplanted into.
Persuasion - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
Sir Thomas was satisfied; too glad to be satisfied, perhaps, to urge the matter quite so far as his judgment might have dictated to others.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
dictatorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a leader who has complete power in a country and has not been elected by the people
You must therefore allow me to follow the dictates of my conscience on this occasion, which leads me to perform what I look on as a point of duty.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
She acknowledged it to be very fitting, that every little social commonwealth should dictate its own matters of discourse; and hoped, ere long, to become a not unworthy member of the one she was now transplanted into.
Persuasion - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
Sir Thomas was satisfied; too glad to be satisfied, perhaps, to urge the matter quite so far as his judgment might have dictated to others.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
disagreeablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unpleasant or unattractive; not agreeing with tastes or expectations
And with this admirable discretion did she defer the assurance of her finding their mutual relatives more disagreeable than ever, and of her being particularly disgusted with his mother, till they were more in private.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 35
By Jane Austen Context
He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
If there is anything disagreeable going on men are always sure to get out of it, and Charles is as bad as any of them.
Persuasion - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
disasterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an event or fact that has unfortunate consequences; catastrophe
Yates considered it only as a temporary interruption, a disaster for the evening, and could even suggest the possibility of the rehearsal being renewed after tea, when the bustle of receiving Sir Thomas were over, and he might be at leisure to be amused by it.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
Some of the cold sense of bewilderment and disaster that had weighted her down since the Tarleton boys told her their gossip was pushed into the background of her mind, and in its place crept the fever that had possessed her for two years.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 2
By Margaret Mitche Context
From an expression which my husband dropped in the first shock of this disaster I understood that terrible public consequences might arise from the loss of this document.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
discontinuespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. stop doing or providing something; put an end to a state or an activity
Immobility being the chief characteristic of that whole which the person formed portion of, the discontinuance of immobility in any quarter suggested confusion.
Return of the Native - Chapter 2
By Thomas Hardy Context
But, finding me well employed, and bearing a good character, and hearing on all hands that I rose fast in the school, she soon discontinued these visits.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
dismissalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. termination of someone's employment
n. permission to go; the sending away of someone
Heathcliff received no flogging, but he was told that the first word he spoke to Miss Catherine should ensure a dismissal; and Mrs.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 6
By Emily Bronte Context
But her hope was apparently centred upon him; and dismissing his regrets Venn determined to aid her to be happy in her own chosen way.
Return of the Native - Chapter 9
By Thomas Hardy Context
Dashwood could think of no other question, and Thomas and the tablecloth, now alike needless, were soon afterwards dismissed.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
disrespectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. lack of respect for
Upon the hint of having spoken disrespectfully or carelessly of the family and the family honours, he was quite indignant.
Persuasion - Chapter 15
By Jane Austen Context
Price, in her turn, was injured and angry; and an answer, which comprehended each sister in its bitterness, and bestowed such very disrespectful reflections on the pride of Sir Thomas as Mrs.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
You have heard that my wife Bertha came back to my unloving arms, and took up her abode in the cottage: where, to speak disrespectfully, she smelled a rat, in the shape of a little bottle of Coty.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
distinctspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. clearly noticeable; that certainly exists
Grimwig lifted up his head, and converting one of the hind legs of his chair into a pivot, described three distinct circles with the assistance of his stick and the table; sitting in it all the time.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
No little Gradgrind had ever seen a face in the moon; it was up in the moon before it could speak distinctly.
Hard Times - Chapter 3
By Charles Dickens Context
In a word, I saw in this Miss Havisham as I had her then and there before my eyes, and always had had her before my eyes; and I saw in this, the distinct shadow of the darkened and unhealthy house in which her life was hidden from the sun.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
ecologyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. science of the relationships between organisms and their environments
economyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. system of trade and industry by which the wealth is made and used
n. efficient use of resources; reduction in cost
And you may be certain when I have the honour of seeing her again, I shall speak in the very highest terms of your modesty, economy, and other amiable qualification.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
She drew up plans of economy, she made exact calculations, and she did what nobody else thought of doing: she consulted Anne, who never seemed considered by the others as having any interest in the question.
Persuasion - Chapter 2
By Jane Austen Context
eighthspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. position eight in a countable series of things
a. coming next after the seventh and just before the ninth in position
I once saw Henry the Eighth acted, or I have heard of it from somebody who did, I am not certain which.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 34
By Jane Austen Context
elasticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. springing back; able to return quickly to a former state or condition
Catherine had reached her full height; her figure was both plump and slender, elastic as steel, and her whole aspect sparkling with health and spirits.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 21
By Emily Bronte Context
As her once elastic walk had become deadened by time, so had her natural pride of life been hindered in its blooming by her necessities.
Return of the Native - Chapter 22
By Thomas Hardy Context
All their elasticity was departed, and I never saw them half so wretched as on this night; insomuch that when the bell rang, and Mr.
David Copperfield - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context
embarrassspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cause someone to feel nervous, worried, or uncomfortable
Smith, to resist the temptation of returning here soon, and yet aware that by declining your invitation, by saying that he was going away for some time, he should seem to act an ungenerous, a suspicious part by our family, he might well be embarrassed and disturbed.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 15
By Jane Austen Context
With astonishment did Elizabeth see that her new acquaintance was at least as much embarrassed as herself.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 44
By Jane Austen Context
Situated as we are with Lady Dalrymple, cousins, we ought to be very careful not to embarrass her with acquaintance she might not approve.
Persuasion - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
emergencyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. sudden unforeseen crisis; condition of urgent need for action or assistance
I did detect a figure creeping along the inner fence of the park; but it was not my young mistress: on its emerging into the light, I recognised one of the grooms.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 24
By Emily Bronte Context
The lower room was in darkness; but by feeling his way he found a table, whereon he placed the bottle, and a minute later emerged again upon the heath.
Return of the Native - Chapter 5
By Thomas Hardy Context
Palmer, who seemed to feel a relief to himself, in leaving behind him a person so well able to assist or advise Miss Dashwood in any emergence.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 43
By Jane Austen Context
emotionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a strong feeling such as love or anger, or strong feelings in general
For that reason I turned away from you this evening when you upset my books, for I was in danger at the time, and any show of surprise and emotion upon your part might have drawn attention to my identity and led to the most deplorable and irreparable results.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was of a sickly colour, and his thin, sandy hair seemed to bristle up with the intensity of his emotion.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Horner, who had shown signs of intense emotion during the proceedings, fainted away at the conclusion and was carried out of court.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
emphasisspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. special attention or effort directed toward something; stress
He looked as calm as though he were discussing the weather, and his smooth drawl fell on her ears with no particular emphasis.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 47
By Margaret Mitche Context
These only chanced to be heard, indeed, or account of their being very frequently repeated with great emphasis.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 3
By Charles Dickens Context
She uttered the word with an eager look, and with strong emphasis, and with a weird smile that had a kind of boast in it.
Great Expectations - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
emphaticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. done or said in a strong way and without any doubt
Twilight combined with the scenery of Egdon Heath to evolve a thing majestic without severity, impressive without showiness, emphatic in its admonitions, grand in its simplicity.
Return of the Native - Chapter 1
By Thomas Hardy Context
Ashley was sitting on his horse, a strained alert look on his face; the Simmons boys were leaning from their buggy, making emphatic gestures; Hugh Elsing, his lock of brown hair falling in his eyes, was waving his hands.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
Shortly remarking that their roads were different, he departed, without more ceremony than an emphatic repetition of the hour of appointment for the following night.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 37
By Charles Dickens Context
encyclopediaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a reference work containing articles on various topics
endeavorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. attempt by employing effort; try to do something
It was quite in vain for me to endeavor to make him sensible that he ought to speak to Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
enterprisespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. organization created for business ventures, especially one that will earn money
The enterprising lady followed the mumming company through the gate in the white paling, and stood before the open porch.
Return of the Native - Chapter 16
By Thomas Hardy Context
I had grand ideas of the wealth and importance of Insurers of Ships in the City, and I began to think with awe of having laid a young Insurer on his back, blackened his enterprising eye, and cut his responsible head open.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
Huck was always willing to take a hand in any enterprise that offered entertainment and required no capital, for he had a troublesome superabundance of that sort of time which is not money.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 25
By Mark Twain Context
episodespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one of the single parts into which a story is divided, especially when it is broadcast on the tv
There was, however, gradually evolved from its transformation scenes a less extravagant episode, in which the heath dimly appeared behind the general brilliancy of the action.
Return of the Native - Chapter 14
By Thomas Hardy Context
The twins had been at home, freshly expelled from the University of Virginia, at the time the Troop was organized and they had joined enthusiastically; but after the shooting episode, two months ago, their mother had packed them off to the state university, with orders to stay there.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
We went on our way up stairs after this episode; and, as we were going up, we met a gentleman groping his way down.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
erodespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. eat away; wear away by abrasion; become worn
escapespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. get free from something, or to avoid something
He carried them over to the window table, because from there he could see if you came across the courtyard, and so could effect an escape.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A few minutes elapsed, as you remember, before the sleepy commissionnaire drew your attention to the bell, and those were just enough to give the thief time to make his escape.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Then they will not lose a minute, for the sooner they do their work the longer time they will have for their escape.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
escortspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. go with a person or vehicle, especially to make certain to leaves or arrives safely
n. one who conducts someone as attendant; guard
I would have departed by the back way, to get a last glimpse of Catherine and annoy old Joseph; but Hareton received orders to lead up my horse, and my host himself escorted me to the door, so I could not fulfil my wish.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 31
By Emily Bronte Context
Lady Dalrymple and Miss Carteret, escorted by Mr Elliot and Colonel Wallis, who had happened to arrive nearly at the same instant, advanced into the room.
Persuasion - Chapter 20
By Jane Austen Context
Rushworth arrived, escorting his mother, who came to be civil and to shew her civility especially, in urging the execution of the plan for visiting Sotherton, which had been started a fortnight before, and which, in consequence of her subsequent absence from home, had since lain dormant.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 8
By Jane Austen Context