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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - North in The Souls of Black Folk
1  The argument gathered tremendous strength South and North; but its very strength was its weakness.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
2  Next to this achievement comes Mr. Washington's work in gaining place and consideration in the North.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
3  Nobody lives in the old house now, but a man comes each winter out of the North and collects his high rents.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
4  Out of the North the train thundered, and we woke to see the crimson soil of Georgia stretching away bare and monotonous right and left.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
5  South of the North, yet north of the South, lies the City of a Hundred Hills, peering out from the shadows of the past into the promise of the future.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In V
6  The decent and reputable citizens of the North who neglected their own civic duties grew hilarious over the exaggerated importance with which the Negro regarded the franchise.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
7  The rich and dominating North, however, was not only weary of the race problem, but was investing largely in Southern enterprises, and welcomed any method of peaceful cooperation.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
8  After Emancipation, and still earlier in the North, the Negro churches largely severed such affiliations as they had had with the white churches, either by choice or by compulsion.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
9  In the North the feeling has several times forced itself into words, that Mr. Washington's counsels of submission overlooked certain elements of true manhood, and that his educational programme was unnecessarily narrow.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
10  Especially is this noticeable in the South, where theology and religious philosophy are on this account a long way behind the North, and where the religion of the poor whites is a plain copy of Negro thought and methods.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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11  For fifty years Negro religion thus transformed itself and identified itself with the dream of Abolition, until that which was a radical fad in the white North and an anarchistic plot in the white South had become a religion to the black world.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
12  Others less shrewd and tactful had formerly essayed to sit on these two stools and had fallen between them; but as Mr. Washington knew the heart of the South from birth and training, so by singular insight he intuitively grasped the spirit of the age which was dominating the North.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
13  It startled the nation to hear a Negro advocating such a programme after many decades of bitter complaint; it startled and won the applause of the South, it interested and won the admiration of the North; and after a confused murmur of protest, it silenced if it did not convert the Negroes themselves.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
14  And finally, when you fasten crime upon this race as its peculiar trait, they answer that slavery was the arch-crime, and lynching and lawlessness its twin abortions; that color and race are not crimes, and yet it is they which in this land receive most unceasing condemnation, North, East, South, and West.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
15  The free Negroes of the North, inspired by the mulatto immigrants from the West Indies, began to change the basis of their demands; they recognized the slavery of slaves, but insisted that they themselves were freemen, and sought assimilation and amalgamation with the nation on the same terms with other men.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
16  For we must never forget that the economic system of the South to-day which has succeeded the old regime is not the same system as that of the old industrial North, of England, or of France, with their trade-unions, their restrictive laws, their written and unwritten commercial customs, and their long experience.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
17  His doctrine has tended to make the whites, North and South, shift the burden of the Negro problem to the Negro's shoulders and stand aside as critical and rather pessimistic spectators; when in fact the burden belongs to the nation, and the hands of none of us are clean if we bend not our energies to righting these great wrongs.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
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