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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - dream in The Souls of Black Folk
1  To keep a dream or grave apart.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
2  What are these dreams to foolish babbling men.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
3  Freedom became to him a real thing and not a dream.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
4  And then he mused and dreamed, and planned a life-work; and the train flew south.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIII
5  Today it makes little difference to Atlanta, to the South, what the Negro thinks or dreams or wills.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In V
6  Her own life builded and moulded itself upon the child; he tinged her every dream and idealized her every effort.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XI
7  So in that little Oneida school there came to those schoolboys a revelation of thought and longing beneath one black skin, of which they had not dreamed before.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XII
8  They who live without knew not nor dreamed of that full power within, that mighty inspiration which the dull gauze of caste decreed that most men should not know.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XII
9  Guerrilla raiding, the ever-present flickering after-flame of war, was spending its forces against the Negroes, and all the Southern land was awakening as from some wild dream to poverty and social revolution.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
10  Thus in the far-away Southern village the world lay waiting, half consciously, the coming of two young men, and dreamed in an inarticulate way of new things that would be done and new thoughts that all would think.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIII
11  But here ninety-six per cent are toiling; no one with leisure to turn the bare and cheerless cabin into a home, no old folks to sit beside the fire and hand down traditions of the past; little of careless happy childhood and dreaming youth.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
12  There was only a black man hurrying on with an ache in his heart, seeing neither sun nor sea, but starting as from a dream at the frightened cry that woke the pines, to see his dark sister struggling in the arms of a tall and fair-haired man.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIII
13  For fifty years Negro religion thus transformed itself and identified itself with the dream of Abolition, until that which was a radical fad in the white North and an anarchistic plot in the white South had become a religion to the black world.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
14  And so we dreamed and loved and planned by fall and winter, and the full flush of the long Southern spring, till the hot winds rolled from the fetid Gulf, till the roses shivered and the still stern sun quivered its awful light over the hills of Atlanta.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XI
15  To him, so far as he thought and dreamed, slavery was indeed the sum of all villainies, the cause of all sorrow, the root of all prejudice; Emancipation was the key to a promised land of sweeter beauty than ever stretched before the eyes of wearied Israelites.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
16  I too mused above his little white bed; saw the strength of my own arm stretched onward through the ages through the newer strength of his; saw the dream of my black fathers stagger a step onward in the wild phantasm of the world; heard in his baby voice the voice of the Prophet that was to rise within the Veil.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XI
17  Atlanta must not lead the South to dream of material prosperity as the touchstone of all success; already the fatal might of this idea is beginning to spread; it is replacing the finer type of Southerner with vulgar money-getters; it is burying the sweeter beauties of Southern life beneath pretence and ostentation.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In V
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