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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - Right in The Souls of Black Folk
1  In the most cultured sections and cities of the South the Negroes are a segregated servile caste, with restricted rights and privileges.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
2  Through history, the powers of single black men flash here and there like falling stars, and die sometimes before the world has rightly gauged their brightness.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
3  Between me and the other world there is ever an unasked question: unasked by some through feelings of delicacy; by others through the difficulty of rightly framing it.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
4  Back of this more formal religion, the Church often stands as a real conserver of morals, a strengthener of family life, and the final authority on what is Good and Right.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
5  Naturally the Negroes resented, at first bitterly, signs of compromise which surrendered their civil and political rights, even though this was to be exchanged for larger chances of economic development.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
6  To be sure, ultimate freedom and assimilation was the ideal before the leaders, but the assertion of the manhood rights of the Negro by himself was the main reliance, and John Brown's raid was the extreme of its logic.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
7  Right across our track, three hundred and sixty years ago, wandered the cavalcade of Hernando de Soto, looking for gold and the Great Sea; and he and his foot-sore captives disappeared yonder in the grim forests to the west.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
8  He is striving nobly to make Negro artisans business men and property-owners; but it is utterly impossible, under modern competitive methods, for workingmen and property-owners to defend their rights and exist without the right of suffrage.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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9  Thus it easily happened that more and more the better class of Negroes followed the advice from abroad and the pressure from home, and took no further interest in politics, leaving to the careless and the venal of their race the exercise of their rights as voters.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
10  The trend of the times, however, refused them recognition save in individual and exceptional cases, considered them as one with all the despised blacks, and they soon found themselves striving to keep even the rights they formerly had of voting and working and moving as freemen.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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11  Feeling that his rights and his dearest ideals are being trampled upon, that the public conscience is ever more deaf to his righteous appeal, and that all the reactionary forces of prejudice, greed, and revenge are daily gaining new strength and fresh allies, the Negro faces no enviable dilemma.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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12  Around us the history of the land has centred for thrice a hundred years; out of the nation's heart we have called all that was best to throttle and subdue all that was worst; fire and blood, prayer and sacrifice, have billowed over this people, and they have found peace only in the altars of the God of Right.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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13  These two arguments were unanswered, and indeed unanswerable: the one that the extraordinary powers of the Bureau threatened the civil rights of all citizens; and the other that the government must have power to do what manifestly must be done, and that present abandonment of the freedmen meant their practical reenslavement.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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14  And all this is gained only by human strife and longing; by ceaseless training and education; by founding Right on righteousness and Truth on the unhampered search for Truth; by founding the common school on the university, and the industrial school on the common school; and weaving thus a system, not a distortion, and bringing a birth, not an abortion.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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