ACCUSTOM in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - accustom in The Last of the Mohicans
1  "Being little accustomed to the practices of the savages, Alice, you mistake the place of real danger," said Heyward.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
2  But Hawkeye was too much accustomed to the war song and the enlistments of the natives, to betray any interest in the passing scene.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
3  Hawkeye, though too much accustomed to Indian artifices not to foresee the danger of the experiment, knew not well how to combat this sudden resolution.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
4  Heyward withdrew to the rampart, too uneasy and too little accustomed to the warfare of the woods to remain at ease under the possibility of such insidious attacks.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
5  One among them, he also was an Indian, moved a little on one flank, and watched the margin of the woods, with eyes long accustomed to read the smallest sign of danger.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
6  Now, friend," said Hawkeye, addressing David, "an exchange of garments will be a great convenience to you, inasmuch as you are but little accustomed to the make-shifts of the wilderness.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
7  He observed by the vacant expression of the Indian's countenance, that his eye, accustomed to the open air had not yet been able to penetrate the dusky light which pervaded the depth of the cavern.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
8  Endeavoring, then, to collect his ideas, he prepared to perform that species of incantation, and those uncouth rites, under which the Indian conjurers are accustomed to conceal their ignorance and impotency.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
9  In short, the whole village or town, whichever it might be termed, possessed more of method and neatness of execution, than the white men had been accustomed to believe belonged, ordinarily, to the Indian habits.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
10  Long practised in all the subtle arts of his race, he drew, with great dexterity and quickness, the fantastic shadow that the natives were accustomed to consider as the evidence of a friendly and jocular disposition.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
11  As Hawkeye and the Mohicans had, however, often traversed the mountains and valleys of this vast wilderness, they did not hesitate to plunge into its depth, with the freedom of men accustomed to its privations and difficulties.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
12  But the scout, who had placed his chin in his hand, with an expression of cold indifference, gradually suffered his rigid features to relax, until, as verse succeeded verse, he felt his iron nature subdued, while his recollection was carried back to boyhood, when his ears had been accustomed to listen to similar sounds of praise, in the settlements of the colony.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
13  The ingenuous Alice gazed at his free air and proud carriage, as she would have looked upon some precious relic of the Grecian chisel, to which life had been imparted by the intervention of a miracle; while Heyward, though accustomed to see the perfection of form which abounds among the uncorrupted natives, openly expressed his admiration at such an unblemished specimen of the noblest proportions of man.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6