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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - age in The Souls of Black Folk
1  He was a Maine man, then only thirty-five years of age.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
2  Within is a fireplace, black and smoky, and usually unsteady with age.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
3  And yet this very singleness of vision and thorough oneness with his age is a mark of the successful man.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
4  The young men marry between the ages of twenty-five and thirty-five; the young women between twenty and thirty.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
5  Indeed, the characteristic of our age is the contact of European civilization with the world's undeveloped peoples.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
6  In that little valley was a strange stillness as I rode up; for death and marriage had stolen youth and left age and childhood there.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
7  In another age he might have sat among the elders of the land in purple-bordered toga; in another country mothers might have sung him to the cradles.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XII
8  There remained two growing girls; a shy midget of eight; John, tall, awkward, and eighteen; Jim, younger, quicker, and better looking; and two babies of indefinite age.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
9  The silently growing assumption of this age is that the probation of races is past, and that the backward races of to-day are of proven inefficiency and not worth the saving.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIV
10  He muttered to me with the murmur of many ages, when he said: "White man sit down whole year; Nigger work day and night and make crop; Nigger hardly gits bread and meat; white man sittin down gits all."
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
11  On the other hand, in matters of simple almsgiving, where there can be no question of social contact, and in the succor of the aged and sick, the South, as if stirred by a feeling of its unfortunate limitations, is generous to a fault.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
12  This is an age of unusual economic development, and Mr. Washington's programme naturally takes an economic cast, becoming a gospel of Work and Money to such an extent as apparently almost completely to overshadow the higher aims of life.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
13  Moreover, this is an age when the more advanced races are coming in closer contact with the less developed races, and the race-feeling is therefore intensified; and Mr. Washington's programme practically accepts the alleged inferiority of the Negro races.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
14  Feeling deeply and keenly the tendencies and opportunities of the age in which they live, their souls are bitter at the fate which drops the Veil between; and the very fact that this bitterness is natural and justifiable only serves to intensify it and make it more maddening.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
15  Others less shrewd and tactful had formerly essayed to sit on these two stools and had fallen between them; but as Mr. Washington knew the heart of the South from birth and training, so by singular insight he intuitively grasped the spirit of the age which was dominating the North.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
16  I too mused above his little white bed; saw the strength of my own arm stretched onward through the ages through the newer strength of his; saw the dream of my black fathers stagger a step onward in the wild phantasm of the world; heard in his baby voice the voice of the Prophet that was to rise within the Veil.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XI