COLOR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - color in The Last of the Mohicans
1  Magua took the hatchet to color it with blood.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
2  The enemy know the shape of your back, but they have never seen the color of your eyes.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
3  "Your pardon, monsieur," rejoined the Frenchman, suffering a slight color to appear on his dark cheek.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
4  I have seldom been where women of my color dwell; but such may be the gifts of nature in the settlements.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
5  The wound of David had dyed the leaves of sassafras with a color that the native well knew as anticipating the season.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
6  I know that they claim not only to have the earth, but that the meanest of their color is better than the Sachems of the red man.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
7  Her complexion was not brown, but it rather appeared charged with the color of the rich blood, that seemed ready to burst its bounds.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
8  Tis wicked fabrication of the whites, and I say it to the shame of my color that would make the warrior bow down before images of his own creation.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
9  He often stopped to examine the trees; nor did he cross a rivulet without attentively considering the quantity, the velocity, and the color of its waters.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
10  He turned and beheld the speaker, whose color had changed to a deadly paleness, and whose lips quivered, gazing after him, with an expression of interest which immediately recalled him to her side.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
11  On the other hand, the scout was obscure; because from the lingering pride of color, he rather affected the cold and artificial manner which characterizes all classes of Anglo-Americans when unexcited.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
12  You might not startle a wolf, or turn the Royal Americans from a discharge; but I have seen the time when you had a better favored look; your streaked countenances are not ill-judged of by the squaws, but young women of white blood give the preference to their own color.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
13  The color of his skin differed from that of most around him, being richer and darker, the latter having been produced by certain delicate and mazy lines of complicated and yet beautiful figures, which had been traced over most of his person by the operation of tattooing.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
14  "God bless you," added the rugged woodsman, bending his head aside, and then instantly changing its direction again, with a wistful look toward the youth; "I loved both you and your father, Uncas, though our skins are not altogether of a color, and our gifts are somewhat different."
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
15  "The dogs and crows of their tribes," continued the earnest old chieftain, without heeding the wounded spirit of his listener, whose head was nearly crushed to the earth in shame, as he proceeded, "would bark and caw before they would take a woman to their wigwams whose blood was not of the color of snow."
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
16  Nothing but the color of his skin had saved the lives of Magua and the conjurer, who would have been the first victims sacrificed to his own security, had not the scout believed such an act, however congenial it might be to the nature of an Indian, utterly unworthy of one who boasted a descent from men that knew no cross of blood.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
17  His head, on the whole of which the hair had been permitted to grow, the pursuits of war having so long been abandoned, was encircled by a sort of plated diadem, which, in its turn, bore lesser and more glittering ornaments, that sparkled amid the glossy hues of three drooping ostrich feathers, dyed a deep black, in touching contrast to the color of his snow-white locks.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
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