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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - escaped in The Souls of Black Folk
1  If he escape to another county, a charge of petty thieving, easily true, can be depended upon to secure his return.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
2  "I am going to accept the situation, Judge Henderson," answered John, with a brevity that did not escape the keen old man.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIII
3  For these there is one other avenue of escape toward which they have turned in increasing numbers, namely, migration to town.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
4  Just as centuries ago it was no easy thing for the serf to escape into the freedom of town-life, even so to-day there are hindrances laid in the way of county laborers.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
5  This, then, is the end of his striving: to be a co-worker in the kingdom of culture, to escape both death and isolation, to husband and use his best powers and his latent genius.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
6  At last we spoke of the neighbors, and as night fell, Uncle Bird told me how, on a night like that, 'Thenie came wandering back to her home over yonder, to escape the blows of her husband.'
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
7  But here he was, angry with life and reckless; and when Fanner Durham charged him with stealing wheat, the old man had to ride fast to escape the stones which the furious fool hurled after him.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
8  In the backwoods of the Gulf States, for miles and miles, he may not leave the plantation of his birth; in well-nigh the whole rural South the black farmers are peons, bound by law and custom to an economic slavery, from which the only escape is death or the penitentiary.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
9  The criminal and the sensualist leave the church for the gambling-hell and the brothel, and fill the slums of Chicago and Baltimore; the better classes segregate themselves from the group-life of both white and black, and form an aristocracy, cultured but pessimistic, whose bitter criticism stings while it points out no way of escape.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
10  The laws are made by men who have little interest in him; they are executed by men who have absolutely no motive for treating the black people with courtesy or consideration; and, finally, the accused law-breaker is tried, not by his peers, but too often by men who would rather punish ten innocent Negroes than let one guilty one escape.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
11  The crop-lien system which is depopulating the fields of the South is not simply the result of shiftlessness on the part of Negroes, but is also the result of cunningly devised laws as to mortgages, liens, and misdemeanors, which can be made by conscienceless men to entrap and snare the unwary until escape is impossible, further toil a farce, and protest a crime.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
12  They have, to be sure, their proportion of ne'er-do-wells, their pedants and lettered fools, but they have a surprisingly small proportion of them; they have not that culture of manner which we instinctively associate with university men, forgetting that in reality it is the heritage from cultured homes, and that no people a generation removed from slavery can escape a certain unpleasant rawness and gaucherie, despite the best of training.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI