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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - home in The Souls of Black Folk
1  I felt sure that Ben and 'Tildy would come to naught from such a home.'
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
2  A neat and tidy home nestled in a flower-garden, and a little store stands beside it.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
3  I saw the home of the Hickmans, but Albert, with his stooping shoulders, had passed from the world.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
4  We were seated near a roadside blacksmith shop, and behind was the bare ruin of some master's home.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
5  And next morning she died in the home that her little bow-legged brother, working and saving, had bought for their widowed mother.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
6  He showed me where Simon Thompson had bought a bit of ground and a home; but his daughter Lana, a plump, brown, slow girl, was not there.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
7  He felt his poverty; without a cent, without a home, without land, tools, or savings, he had entered into competition with rich, landed, skilled neighbors.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
8  There are fences and pigs and cows, and the soft-voiced, velvet-skinned young Memnon, who sauntered half-bashfully over to greet the strangers, is proud of his home.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
9  Brother Dennis, the carpenter, built a new house with six rooms; Josie toiled a year in Nashville, and brought back ninety dollars to furnish the house and change it to a home.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
10  It is full easy now to see that the man who lost home, fortune, and family at a stroke, and saw his land ruled by "mules and niggers," was really benefited by the passing of slavery.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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11  Next morning I crossed the tall round hill, lingered to look at the blue and yellow mountains stretching toward the Carolinas, then plunged into the wood, and came out at Josie's home.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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12  She seemed to be the centre of the family: always busy at service, or at home, or berry-picking; a little nervous and inclined to scold, like her mother, yet faithful, too, like her father.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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13  At last we spoke of the neighbors, and as night fell, Uncle Bird told me how, on a night like that, 'Thenie came wandering back to her home over yonder, to escape the blows of her husband.'
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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14  These were the saddest sights of that woful day; and no man clasped the hands of these two passing figures of the present-past; but, hating, they went to their long home, and, hating, their children's children live today.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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15  When the spring came, and the birds twittered, and the stream ran proud and full, little sister Lizzie, bold and thoughtless, flushed with the passion of youth, bestowed herself on the tempter, and brought home a nameless child.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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16  And so thoroughly did he learn the speech and thought of triumphant commercialism, and the ideals of material prosperity, that the picture of a lone black boy poring over a French grammar amid the weeds and dirt of a neglected home soon seemed to him the acme of absurdities.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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17  The red stain of bastardy, which two centuries of systematic legal defilement of Negro women had stamped upon his race, meant not only the loss of ancient African chastity, but also the hereditary weight of a mass of corruption from white adulterers, threatening almost the obliteration of the Negro home.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
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