HOPE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - hope in The Souls of Black Folk
1  Even so is the hope that sang in the songs of my fathers well sung.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIV
2  It is a land of rapid contrasts and of curiously mingled hope and pain.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VII
3  They lived and ate together, studied and worked, hoped and harkened in the dawning light.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
4  Nevertheless, he struggled hopefully on, and seemed to see at last some glimmering of dawn.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In XIII
5  The "Coming of the Lord" swept this side of Death, and came to be a thing to be hoped for in this day.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
6  Here again the hope for the future depended peculiarly on careful and delicate dealing with these criminals.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
7  Here it was that the Home was ruined under the very shadow of the Church, white and black; here habits of shiftlessness took root, and sullen hopelessness replaced hopeful strife.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
8  Conscious of his impotence, and pessimistic, he often becomes bitter and vindictive; and his religion, instead of a worship, is a complaint and a curse, a wail rather than a hope, a sneer rather than a faith.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
9  We cannot hope, then, in this generation, or for several generations, that the mass of the whites can be brought to assume that close sympathetic and self-sacrificing leadership of the blacks which their present situation so eloquently demands.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IX
10  Such men forget that the cotton crop has doubled, and more than doubled, since the era of slavery, and that, even granting their contention, the Negro is still supreme in a Cotton Kingdom larger than that on which the Confederacy builded its hopes.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VIII
11  Sprung from the African forests, where its counterpart can still be heard, it was adapted, changed, and intensified by the tragic soul-life of the slave, until, under the stress of law and whip, it became the one true expression of a people's sorrow, despair, and hope.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In X
12  Work and wealth are the mighty levers to lift this old new land; thrift and toil and saving are the highways to new hopes and new possibilities; and yet the warning is needed lest the wily Hippomenes tempt Atalanta to thinking that golden apples are the goal of racing, and not mere incidents by the way.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In V
13  One class is spiritually descended from Toussaint the Savior, through Gabriel, Vesey, and Turner, and they represent the attitude of revolt and revenge; they hate the white South blindly and distrust the white race generally, and so far as they agree on definite action, think that the Negro's only hope lies in emigration beyond the borders of the United States.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III