KNOWLEDGE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - knowledge in The Last of the Mohicans
1  No, no; my knowledge for it, neither of them was nigh fainting, hereaway.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
2  "'Tis extraordinary that he should have withheld his knowledge so long," muttered Duncan, at his elbow.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
3  The scout ruminated, like a man digesting his newly-acquired knowledge, and once more stole a glance at the horses.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
4  Heyward possessed some knowledge of the mummery practised among the Indians, in the cases of such supposed visitations.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
5  It is enough, for the present, that we trusted to an Indian guide to take us by a nearer, though blinder path, and that we are deceived in his knowledge.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  Here the scout seemed to be once more at home, for he held on this way with the certainty and diligence of a man who moved in the security of his own knowledge.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
7  They were followed at a little distance by the scout, with a view to profit early by their report, and to obtain some faint knowledge for himself of the more immediate localities.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
8  Even so; sucking babes are not more dependent on those who guide them than we who are of larger growth, and who may now be said to possess the stature without the knowledge of men.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
9  A quiet smile lighted the haughty features of the young Mohican, betraying his knowledge of the English language as well as of the other's meaning; but he suffered it to pass away without vindication of reply.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
10  His gaze at the ramparts was not that of a curious or idle spectator; but his looks wandered from point to point, denoting his knowledge of military usages, and betraying that his search was not unaccompanied by distrust.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
11  Heyward yielded the guidance of the canoe implicitly to the scout, who approached or receded from the shore, to avoid the fragments of rocks, or deeper parts of the river, with a readiness that showed his knowledge of the route they held.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
12  We are not about to start on a squirrel hunt, or to drive a deer into the Horican, but to outlie for days and nights, and to stretch across a wilderness where the feet of men seldom go, and where no bookish knowledge would carry you through harmless.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
13  Well informed of the approach of every danger, while it is yet at a distance, the Indian generally rests secure under his knowledge of the signs of the forest, and the long and difficult paths that separate him from those he has most reason to dread.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
14  "You showed knowledge in the shaping of a birchen bark, Uncas, when you chose this from among the Huron canoes," said the scout, smiling, apparently more in satisfaction at their superiority in the race than from that prospect of final escape which now began to open a little upon them.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
15  Such exhibitions were not uncommon among the Indians, and as Duncan was already sufficiently disguised in his dress, there certainly did exist some reason for believing that, with his knowledge of French, he might pass for a juggler from Ticonderoga, straggling among the allied and friendly tribes.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
16  Thus far the knowledge of Heyward assisted him in the explanation; and as he now knew that the interruption was caused by the unlooked-for return of a successful war-party, every disagreeable sensation was quieted in inward congratulation, for the opportune relief and insignificance it conferred on himself.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
17  Uncas was bold enough to say, that the beasts ridden by the gentle ones," continued Hawkeye, glancing his eyes, not without curious interest, on the fillies of the ladies, "planted the legs of one side on the ground at the same time, which is contrary to the movements of all trotting four-footed animals of my knowledge, except the bear.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.