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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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1  He was a Maine man, then only thirty-five years of age.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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2  To be a poor man is hard, but to be a poor race in a land of dollars is the very bottom of hardships.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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3  And yet this very singleness of vision and thorough oneness with his age is a mark of the successful man.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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4  Any man might well have hesitated to assume charge of such a work, with vast responsibilities, indefinite powers, and limited resources.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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5  It is wrong to encourage a man or a people in evil-doing; it is wrong to aid and abet a national crime simply because it is unpopular not to do so.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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6  The alternative thus offered the nation was not between full and restricted Negro suffrage; else every sensible man, black and white, would easily have chosen the latter.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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7  It is full easy now to see that the man who lost home, fortune, and family at a stroke, and saw his land ruled by "mules and niggers," was really benefited by the passing of slavery.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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8  He simply wishes to make it possible for a man to be both a Negro and an American, without being cursed and spit upon by his fellows, without having the doors of Opportunity closed roughly in his face.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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9  An honest man, with too much faith in human nature, little aptitude for business and intricate detail, he had had large opportunity of becoming acquainted at first hand with much of the work before him.
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10  To gain the sympathy and cooperation of the various elements comprising the white South was Mr. Washington's first task; and this, at the time Tuskegee was founded, seemed, for a black man, well-nigh impossible.
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11  In such a situation, the granting of the ballot to the black man was a necessity, the very least a guilty nation could grant a wronged race, and the only method of compelling the South to accept the results of the war.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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12  These were the saddest sights of that woful day; and no man clasped the hands of these two passing figures of the present-past; but, hating, they went to their long home, and, hating, their children's children live today.
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13  They deprecate the sight of scattered counsels, of internal disagreement; and especially they dislike making their just criticism of a useful and earnest man an excuse for a general discharge of venom from small-minded opponents.
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14  Here in America, in the few days since Emancipation, the black man's turning hither and thither in hesitant and doubtful striving has often made his very strength to lose effectiveness, to seem like absence of power, like weakness.
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15  They cooperate with Mr. Washington as far as they conscientiously can; and, indeed, it is no ordinary tribute to this man's tact and power that, steering as he must between so many diverse interests and opinions, he so largely retains the respect of all.
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16  Through the pressure of the money-makers, the Negro is in danger of being reduced to semi-slavery, especially in the country districts; the workingmen, and those of the educated who fear the Negro, have united to disfranchise him, and some have urged his deportation; while the passions of the ignorant are easily aroused to lynch and abuse any black man.
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17  Not a single Southern legislature stood ready to admit a Negro, under any conditions, to the polls; not a single Southern legislature believed free Negro labor was possible without a system of restrictions that took all its freedom away; there was scarcely a white man in the South who did not honestly regard Emancipation as a crime, and its practical nullification as a duty.
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