SLAVERY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - slavery in The Souls of Black Folk
1  It was rather a choice between suffrage and slavery, after endless blood and gold had flowed to sweep human bondage away.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
2  The disappointment and impatience of the Negroes at the persistence of slavery and serfdom voiced itself in two movements.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
3  The teachers in these institutions came not to keep the Negroes in their place, but to raise them out of the defilement of the places where slavery had wallowed them.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
4  The debates wandered over the whole policy of the administration and the general question of slavery, without touching very closely the specific merits of the measure in hand.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
5  Bureau courts tended to become centres simply for punishing whites, while the regular civil courts tended to become solely institutions for perpetuating the slavery of blacks.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
6  It is full easy now to see that the man who lost home, fortune, and family at a stroke, and saw his land ruled by "mules and niggers," was really benefited by the passing of slavery.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
7  This programme, however, we are sorely puzzled in carrying out through that part of the land where the blight of slavery fell hardest, and where we are dealing with two backward peoples.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
8  The mass of those to whom slavery was a dim recollection of childhood found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them, and they answered with little, and yet it ridiculed their offering.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
9  In a distracted land where slavery had hardly fallen, to keep the strong from wanton abuse of the weak, and the weak from gloating insolently over the half-shorn strength of the strong, was a thankless, hopeless task.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
10  Not even ten additional years of slavery could have done so much to throttle the thrift of the freedmen as the mismanagement and bankruptcy of the series of savings banks chartered by the Nation for their especial aid.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
11  The tendency is here, born of slavery and quickened to renewed life by the crazy imperialism of the day, to regard human beings as among the material resources of a land to be trained with an eye single to future dividends.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
12  And the Negro knew full well that, whatever their deeper convictions may have been, Southern men had fought with desperate energy to perpetuate this slavery under which the black masses, with half-articulate thought, had writhed and shivered.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
13  So here we stand among thoughts of human unity, even through conquest and slavery; the inferiority of black men, even if forced by fraud; a shriek in the night for the freedom of men who themselves are not yet sure of their right to demand it.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
14  To him, so far as he thought and dreamed, slavery was indeed the sum of all villainies, the cause of all sorrow, the root of all prejudice; Emancipation was the key to a promised land of sweeter beauty than ever stretched before the eyes of wearied Israelites.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
15  With the prestige of the government back of it, and a directing board of unusual respectability and national reputation, this banking institution had made a remarkable start in the development of that thrift among black folk which slavery had kept them from knowing.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
16  In the backwoods of the Gulf States, for miles and miles, he may not leave the plantation of his birth; in well-nigh the whole rural South the black farmers are peons, bound by law and custom to an economic slavery, from which the only escape is death or the penitentiary.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In II
17  Her ancient university foundations dwindled and withered under the foul breath of slavery; and even since the war they have fought a failing fight for life in the tainted air of social unrest and commercial selfishness, stunted by the death of criticism, and starving for lack of broadly cultured men.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In V
18  In the midst, then, of the larger problem of Negro education sprang up the more practical question of work, the inevitable economic quandary that faces a people in the transition from slavery to freedom, and especially those who make that change amid hate and prejudice, lawlessness and ruthless competition.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI
19  The free Negroes of the North, inspired by the mulatto immigrants from the West Indies, began to change the basis of their demands; they recognized the slavery of slaves, but insisted that they themselves were freemen, and sought assimilation and amalgamation with the nation on the same terms with other men.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
20  At the same time the white South, by reason of its sudden conversion from the slavery ideal, by so much the more became set and strengthened in its racial prejudice, and crystallized it into harsh law and harsher custom; while the marvellous pushing forward of the poor white daily threatened to take even bread and butter from the mouths of the heavily handicapped sons of the freedmen.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In VI